Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Chinese High Fashion Photo

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 28, 2012


“China” and “Fashion” go together like ammonia and bleach, a literally toxic mix.

I’ve been here many a moon, or as the Brits would say ‘many a fortnight’. (Actually I have no idea what a fortnight is, I think it is two weeks, but I fail to see the logic of the term. In addition, wtf is a ‘stone’? I heard our friends in the UK use it as a form of measurement of weight. To me it sounds awkward, kind of like asking how many ‘hands’ tall you are.)

Back to the subject matter at hand-fashion. This guy at http://www.chinesepeoplehavenostyle.com has a sight that critiques Chinese fashion, so it got me to thinking….

My thoughts wandered as they tend to do, but I began to take note of what the Chinese attire themselves with. I’d like to say that I once worked in the Telephone road area of Houston, Texas which is an ‘economically challenged’ area. And while there I saw some oddities like women wearing negligees to the mini mart, curlers in clubs and shower caps as a head adornment. But nothing can compare to what the Chinese call fashion.

These are photos of a Chinese model, showing off the latest in Chinese style. Draped over her panzer-tank like body is what appears to be a child’s bedsheet for a top and those odd dish-washing forearm things they all seem to find favor with. On her rotund rear is a pair of Leervias and she’s got some ADDridraasss sneeks to complete her ensemble.

China I salute your fashion sense and innovative spirit…

(ps don’t hate, ‘cuz you know I am just writing what the rest of you are thinking but are too pc to say)

2 Responses to “Chinese High Fashion Photo”

  1. Brewskie said

    Oh dude, dude, dude, dude… this is some good shit here!

    It’s a gem. This is a rare moment of perfection where everyone’s on the A-game; it’s as if you’re working with the Founding Fathers, or Neils Bohr, Albert Einstein and Max Planck under one roof, or you have a diamond of a presidential administration (think FDR or Eisenhower). In a day of high-price oil, it’s as if you struck a Ghawar oil field with your shovel; or you saw a parade float batter belt one out of Wrigley Field, straight into Lake Michigan, and he trances around the bases with a giant middle finger comprised of his smoldering bat at the slack-jawed pitcher

    A good fellow named Sascha writes a blog about his experience in Chengdu. Here he writes about construction quality in town, and surprise surprise, it sucks. Vouching for Sascha are the commentators; all but one, a likely dipshit commie or elitist trust fund kid, agreed and spelled out their observations, too.

    However, as good as Sascha’s essay is, I instead will be citing what a reader wrote first (I’ll cite Sascha’s work later or tomorrow or whenever; or you can do the dirty work if you like) – which actually BEATS Sascha’s post!!! (He looked through 50 apartments in 3 months…) Yes, this is wordy and long as hell, but worth the time.

    http://www.chengduliving.com/on-the-frontlines-of-chinas-real-estate-bubble/

    “So began my soon to be arduously comical search for a decent place to live in the city. I was particularly diligent in my search, wanting to get a good feel for real estate in Chengdu, not least as I’m here working for a property developer myself. I used a number of websites to build a list of properties/apartments, and also began vetting agents who seemed at least half way efficient. Little did I know!

    At first I was looking at the most recently completed complexes in various points across the city, though initially just in the South. ‘Master’ building was one such property, and I recall being shocked the moment I got within the perimeter of the building at just how unbelievably bad the workmanship was on all of the exterior finishing. Misplaced/misaligned glass panels, non uniform sealant, poorly finished concrete, uneven/sloppy paintwork, and a slew of construction debris still remaining. It wasn’t about to get any better once I stepped inside!

    I was met by an agent who had set up some 5 or 6 ‘viewings’, which I then found out often meant standing around waiting for the landlord to get him/herself in gear and show up. Another phenomenon here in Chengdu/China is the developers practice of selling units without finishing of any kind, leaving purchasers to carry out all such works themselves. I should point out it is my job to essentially oversee all facets of new construction from the ground up, right through to purchase. One major component of my job is to critique finishing, and then subsequently create deficiency lists for all sub contractors, who then typically return and make good. It was pretty clear from the get go that no such lists are being made here. I couldn’t believe just how bad everything had been put together, let alone the often hideous colour/textile coordination on display. From purple couches on green carpet, to cracks running the entire length of walls, I was in new territory, and it was scary as hell.

    I was met by an agent who had set up some 5 or 6 ‘viewings’, which I then found out often meant standing around waiting for the landlord to get him/herself in gear and show up. Another phenomenon here in Chengdu/China is the developers practice of selling units without finishing of any kind, leaving purchasers to carry out all such works themselves. I should point out it is my job to essentially oversee all facets of new construction from the ground up, right through to purchase. One major component of my job is to critique finishing, and then subsequently create deficiency lists for all sub contractors, who then typically return and make good. It was pretty clear from the get go that no such lists are being made here. I couldn’t believe just how bad everything had been put together, let alone the often hideous colour/textile coordination on display. From purple couches on green carpet, to cracks running the entire length of walls, I was in new territory, and it was scary as hell.

    This continued on for almost 3 months, in which time I viewed a total of 50+ apartments. I’d had to put up with agents showing me properties that didn’t match in any way what I’d specified, along with all the cat and mousing, to finally accepting that I needed to just take something to save me from my search nightmare. And so I settled for a 2 bedroom furnished apartment on the 35th floor of one of the Times Residence buildings. Newly completed beside Lang Kwai Fong, and since having become the most expensive real estate in downtown Chengdu, I was at least happy to have found something new, with an awesome South view from the living room and bedrooms. The games began pretty much immediately. Over the next 6 months I fell into a continuous battle with the landlord’s property ‘managers’, who had been assigned to take care of the 5 properties comprising the 35th floor he had bought as an investment. I did some homework and found out that he had originally let his ‘girlfriend’ take care of the finishing, at which point it became fairly obvious that she had taken the money and spent as little as possible on construction costs and furnishings. In my 6 months tenancy I had to endure 3 kitchen floods, failing back flow preventers (creating a permanent stink throughout the apartment), a faulty shower drain, a front door that wouldn’t lock, intermittent power cuts, and a whole host of defects due to poor finishing. I’ve probably forgotten a few items, but I’m not going to think too hard on it trying to remember, the experience itself was draining enough. It took almost 3 months to get a response to anything, whilst my agent had absolved himself of any responsibility in that time, and finally in the fourth month I was sat down trying to negotiate with the managers. It became immediately clear they did not have a clue how to go about fixing anything, and even though I’d helped them create a thorough step by step list of things ‘to do’, they fell short by continuing to bring workers into the apartment who may as well have been blind. Sure enough a comedy of errors ensued, with works needing to be redone almost as soon as they were complete. In the end I gave up and went about finding a new place.”

  2. Brewskie said

    Okay, gotta go to bed, but I’ll cite some of Sascha’s work here (he said low quality steel and concrete is causing towers to twist at the top):

    http://www.chengduliving.com/on-the-frontlines-of-chinas-real-estate-bubble/

    “China’s real estate boom is one massive swindle. Not only are billions being spent on empty cities and lonely skycrapers, but a comparable amount of money is being spent by property owners on furbishing and re-furbishing their new apartments with shoddy work, overpriced appliances and other useless trappings of the wealthy elite. Apartments sold for millions of RMB are structurally worth much less and the cost of outfitting one of these apartments reaches the price per square meter of buying one in the first place.

    […]

    The problem is, farmers can’t decipher 3D and most if not all of the workers putting together the cabinets, measuring out the dimensions of windows, and tiling the bathroom walls are cheap countryside labor accustomed to cheap countryside construction methods.

    Everything gets measured using the 差不多 (chabuduo = near enough) maxim, especially when the plans are written in the equivalent of a different language. Just because the home costs 100x what a farmer pays for his house does not mean the quality of anything in the home is anywhere near the same ratio. The concrete is watered-down, the wood is knotty, the metal is thin, the screws strip easy, the silicon peels, the tiles crack and every single measurement is off. So for one house I stood in and marveled at, the difference between the lowest point of the floor and the highest point was 15cm. That is quite a difference.

    Most customers have no clue that the tiles in their bathroom are uneven, that the cabinets aren’t flush with the walls or that the walls themselves lean. For them it’s just a matter of dishing out the cash necessary for the designer couch, brand name toilet, the western style washer/dryer and surrounding everything with the best Ikea has to offer.

    But if you happen to know something of construction, then you will end up puling your hair out in frustration as yet another crew of workers walk off of the site because they were required to add level after level of flooring just to reduce the discrepancy from 30+cm to 15cm and that is something that is just way out of line. The vast majority of a crew’s clients will never require them to fix or re-do a thing – when they are forced to do so for the same wage, then outfitting a house can stretch out across months and months.

    […]

    International players like Kohler and G.E. are aware of the big bucks to be made off of wealthy yet ignorant Chinese homebuyers. Kohler manufactures sinks and toilets in China (definitely NOT for export). The sinks are often not flush and the toilet seat comes with one set of screws, nuts, bolts and clamps. If the set does not fit the design you had for your bathroom, then you are out of luck. Kohler does not service anything and will not sell one single screw. Kohler in Sheboygan and elsewhere probably has a different track record for service and quality, but in China they (or their local partner) can get away with bad quality, unresponsive service and still be able to charge more in China than for the same product sold in the USA.

    […]

    G.E. sells their older model washers and dryers here in China. Not only are Chinese buying an older product for around 10,000 RMB, – almost twice the price of GE’s newest and most popular model – but few, if any, Chinese homes are designed with a washer and dryer in mind. Installing a washer and dryer is not rocket science, but it does require a bit of know-how; how many contract laborers scoured from the underpasses along Chengdu’s Third Ring Road have any clue how to install one? The answer is not many. One homeowner put her washer and dryer in a room in the basement. When the black mold took over the room and started invading the rest of the house, she called up and asked,

    “You have a washer and dryer right? What do you do with all of the black stuff?”

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