Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for February 16th, 2011

Chinese Street Scene

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


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Beijing Shops

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


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China’s Tshinghua Dean Lies on His Resume

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


This excerpt shows more about academic fraud in China. The bottom line is that in China, pride and money govern everything. So, if China can get ‘face’ by making proclamations that are untrue, they dont care, as long as everyone believes them. Then, if found to be frauds, they claim ignorance. Ultimately the ‘credibility gap’ in China is so huge that it’s hard to take this place seriously. Maybe this is the reason that after reading about this advance or discovery from China, I sigh and look at the buildings that are collapsing a few years after thier construction and roll my eyes, and then get myself some Chongqing la ze zhi (sp)….

excerpt
“…Tsing Hua University, widely known as China’s MIT. As the students and teachers walk and bicycle to and from classes here, it’s clear from the imposing new law school and other new buildings that the government is pumping a lot of money into this school to make it a world-class university. But the school’s reputation suffered when the assistant dean of the medical school here, was found to have lied on his resume. The dean cited another scholar’s research paper as his own, and falsely claimed to have been a research director at the New York University medical school. Tsing Hua quietly fired the dean in March.

Yang Yusheng, a professor of American history at the China University of Politics and Law, says that Chinese universities emphasized the quantity of academics’ published work, over their quality. He adds that the schools have failed to teach students the basics of how to research and study”

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Chinese Contracts

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


Really good excerpt about Chinese contract formation.

excerpt from here:

the 1999 UCL, whilst creating a new level of sophistication in Chinese contract law, was feared to “create problems because some of its terms and approaches do not fit the reality of Chinese business and legal practices. ” Furthermore, the UCL adopted concepts which were seemingly similar to those found in other contract law jurisdictions, but which in reality had different meanings in the context of the UCL. For example, terms such as ‘offer’ and ‘acceptance’ are used (Articles 13, 14 and 21), but associated concepts in common law such as ‘consideration’ are not used, which could lead to confusion. The 1999 UCL also uses concepts such as ‘fairness’ (Article 5) and ‘good faith’ (Article 6) which are open-ended and offer little further guidance as to their application. Thus, this “reliance on open-ended terms derived from foreign models is likely to undermine efficiency in the short run and give more discretion to Chinese courts and bureaucrats. ” In general, the 1999 UCL provides great flexibility in dealing with various contractual issues such as frustration and termination. However, “this very flexibility… will create challenges for the legal system and some uncertainty for parties because of vague or inconsistent standards. ”16 The effect of this was that contractual parties in China had to draft the terms of their contracts very carefully in order to avoid potential disputes. Indeed, such vague legislative provisions may seem alien to some foreign investors, but it could be argued that such vagueness also played an important role by giving judges the power to construe the law in the best way in an emerging commercial environment. On the other hand, this ignores the powerful argument that “the inherent problem with vagueness is that it leads to inconsistency and may serve as a vehicle for corruption. ”17

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China and Law

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


excerpt from here:

Once in a while, for example, the Party allows certain high cadres to face the force of the Law (Chen Liangyu’s demise in 2006 and conviction in 2008 for corruption and abuse of office) or itself to inject “pills of democratic functioning” into the political machine: At the XVII Party Congress, held in October 2007, the Party leadership allowed 15% of nominees to fail to get elected. See, John L. Thornton, ‘Long Time Coming: Prospect for Democracy in China’ Foreign Affairs, vol. 87, n.1 (January February 2008), pp 8, 9. 9 Surveys and researches on governance show that popular support for governments is not always entailed by the presence in the political system of strong democratic institutions, or vice versa. China might score poorly in some of the variables that help define democracy (Law abiding government, Controlling corruption, Competition, Electoral participation, Political interest, Political efficacy, Vertical accountability, Horizontal accountability, Freedom, Equality, Responsiveness) ..but in others scores better results.

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Traveling in Stylye in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


from the chinadaily.com

7 found hiding in bus luggage hold
Seven excess passengers were found hiding in the trunk of a coach on Yongjin Expressway in East China’s Zhejiang province, Feb 13, 2011. [Photo/Qianjiang Evening News]

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Fraudulent China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


Below is an excellent excerpt about the problem of fraud in China.

excerpt
” Mr. Zhang, 47, was not from a long line of doctors (his father was a weaver). Nor did he earn a degree from Beijing Medical University (his only formal education, it turned out, was the brief correspondence course he took after losing his job at a textile mill).(THIS IS REFERENCING A MAN WHO WAS A SUPPOSED SPECIALIST IN TMC- CHINESE MEDICINE)
The exposure of Mr. Zhang’s faked credentials provoked a fresh round of hand-wringing over what many scholars and Chinese complain are the dishonest practices that permeate society, including students who cheat on college entrance exams, scholars who promote fake or unoriginal research, and dairy companies that sell poisoned milk to infants.

The most recent string of revelations has been bracing. After a plane crash in August killed 42 people in northeast China, officials discovered that 100 pilots who worked for the airline’s parent company had falsified their flying histories. Then there was the padded résumé of Tang Jun, the millionaire former head of Microsoft China and something of a national hero, who falsely claimed to have received a doctorate from the California Institute of Technology.

But in China, fakery in one area in particular — education and scientific research — is pervasive enough that many here worry it could make it harder for the country to climb the next rung on the economic ladder….a lack of integrity among researchers is hindering China’s potential and harming collaboration between Chinese scholars and their international counterparts, scholars in China and abroad say.

“If we don’t change our ways, we will be excluded from the global academic community,” … Zhang Ming, a professor of international relations at Renmin University in Beijing.

Pressure on scholars by administrators of state-run universities to earn journal citations — a measure of innovation — has produced a deluge of plagiarized or fabricated research. In December, a British journal that specializes in crystal formations announced that it was withdrawing more than 70 papers by Chinese authors whose research was of questionable originality or rigor.

Last month a collection of scientific journals published by Zhejiang University in Hangzhou reignited the firestorm by publicizing results from a 20-month experiment with software that detects plagiarism. The software, called CrossCheck, rejected nearly a third of all submissions on suspicion that the content was pirated from previously published research. In some cases, more than 80 percent of a paper’s content was deemed unoriginal.”

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Chinese Survey Reports that 70% of Chinese Feel Insecure About Food Safety

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


Tshinghua, a well known Chinese university reported that 70% of respondents to a recent survey felt insecure and presumably did not trust Chinese food, due to safety concerns.
Oh yeah, the US does import quite a bit of food from China, so check your labels.

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More Chinese Stock Fraud in the US…

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


While I love the food here and they treat foreigners very well, I think Chinese accounting and financial methods are as transparent as Beijing air. And while I realize that we as Americans are unable to put off gratification and truly analyze many things and if a Chinese stock is hot then we need to jump on the band wagon and get a few shares as well. Twenty percent of all Chinese stocks listed in the US are being investigated for fraud, and by this point if you get caught holding these stocks then shame on you for being dumb…- really. Anyway, here is another incidence of a Chinese company listing its stock in the US market, only to have allegedly lied about everything from sales to contracts.

excerpt from here:
“By now anyone who invests in China stocks is familiar with the carnage going on with the stock of Rino International(RINO_). On Nov.10, the Hong Kong based research duo (and dedicated short seller) known as Muddy Waters produced a 30-page report on Rino declaring it to be an abject fraud and with a target price of $2.45 vs. its then price of around $15.00.
he stock has now been halted and the share price stands at $6.07, a decline of 60% in seven days. Their auditor, Frazer Frost, came out on Friday and confirmed that there were in fact phony contracts with revenues that didn’t exist and other irregularities.”

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Report Shows that up to 60% of Rice in Southern China is Toxic!

Posted by w_thames_the_d on February 16, 2011


From the chinadaily.com

“The research team, led by Professor Pan Genxin…in 2008, this time concentrating on the country’s southern region. It found that over 60 percent of the rice samples it took were tainted with cadmium. In some samples, the cadmium level was equal to five times of the legal maximum. ”

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