Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for March 26th, 2011

Blinking, CCTV and Insensitivity

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


I am going to go out on a limb here and make a statement that may seem rash, judgmental and or ill thought out, but what the hell, it is my blog…
Have you ever noticed how much the CCTV reporters (the chinese ones) blink when they talk? To me it’s pretty bizarre. I’d venture to guess that for ever three or four words they utter, they flutter their eyeballs. The reason I ask is that I remember reading once that Dick Cheney was doing an interview with someone, I forget whom, and the guy didn’t blink for almost a minute. The article then stated that constant blinking is a sign of a dumbass (no just kidding) but it did say that those who are intelligent do not blink as often as those who do. So then I sit here watching CCTV and their eyes are going up and down the whole time and I just gotta wonder……

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Chicom TV and The Angry Englishman

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


Being that I am a masochist and like to complain, I treated myself to a dose of CCTV last night. My question is who is that really angry looking English guy who does the world news? I mean I give him props for his work, unlike the rest of the CCTV staff, the guy doesn’t fumble with his words and is coherent, but man does he look angry. I should have taken a photo of the guy but did not. Have you guys seen this man? He kinda looks like Bates mom in the movie Psycho.

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Funny Chinese Food

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


From Engrish.com

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Japan’s Little Nuclear Droplets Now Found in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


Here is an excerpt from the Chinadaily
BEIJING – The first signs of radioactive materials from the quake-hit Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant in Japan was found in northeast China’s Heilongjiang Province on Thursday, China’s nuclear authorities said on Saturday.

An infinitesimal amount of radioactive iodine-131 was detected in the atmosphere in northeast Heilongjiang Province. After conducting tests, China’s National Nuclear Emergency Coordination Committee (CNNECC) confirmed on Saturday that the radioactive material was from the Fukushima plant.

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China, The Olympics, Sanlu and Deadly Milk Coverup

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


From The Party- (Richard Mcgregor)
It was one week, almost to the minute, ahead of the opening of the Beijing Olympics, when the senior executives of the country’s largest supplier of milk formula were summoned to an emergency meeting. It didn’t take long for the mood in the conference room to turn grim, even panicky. For years beforehand, China’s senior leaders had meticulously managed the preparations for the games, timed to open at an auspicious moment on the Chinese calendar, at 8.00 p.m. on the eighth day of August 2008. Whole neighbourhoods in Beijing had been cleared to make way for the sports extravaganza. Giant steel factories were moved out of the city and a million cars ordered off the roads just ahead of time to cut pollution.
Offshore, the government had tweaked diplomatic policy just enough to throw critics of China’s human rights record temporarily off course. In the final, nervous days ahead of the games, senior leaders had personally intervened to replace the young girl chosen to sing the national anthem at the opening ceremony with someone they deemed more suitable. Nothing was to get in the way of the moment designed to embody China’s rightful return to the ranks of great powers.
The Olympics were preying heavily on the minds of the executives of the Sanlu Dairy Corp. as night fell on 1 August over the sprawling company headquarters in Shijiazhuang, the capital of Hebei province, about ninety minutes’ drive from the capital. Sanlu (‘Three Deers’) had been an enthusiastic sponsor of the pre-games festivities. The day before, the Olympics torch, canonized as a ‘sacred flame’ by the central government, had passed through the city en route to the ceremony in Beijing, carried on its way by a privileged few staff members from the company. Now, Sanlu executives were confronted with a crisis that could turn a time of great national pride into near panic for large swathes of the population and a deep loss of face for the Party. After months of fending off consumer complaints about its milk powder, the company’s top executives had just been handed irrefutable evidence that its best-selling formula was laced with large doses of an industrial chemical. Hundreds of thousands of babies whose sole nourishment was the company’s liquefied powder were slowly being poisoned. Presiding over the meeting was Tian Wenhua, the Sanlu chairwoman who had built the company from a small city dairy into a famous national brand. Ms Tian allowed debate to rage for hours among the ten or so assembled executives until just before sunrise the next morning, when she finally settled on a course of action. Instead of confessing to its customers about the contamination, she directed that it be covered up. Combining silence with stealth, the meeting resolved to quietly withdraw Sanlu products from warehouses and gradually replace the contaminated milk powder with new, safe batches of formula. Any formula already sold would not be touched, sitting in homes until it was consumed. Ms Tian, a former vet with school-marmish looks and the plain, unadorned style of many high-ranking women cadres, closed the meeting at 4.00 a.m. with an order that the detailed minutes of the meeting be censored as well, to prevent any leaks.
In what would be one of her last acts at the company she had run for two decades, she told her colleagues: ‘This is to control the situation.’ As events transpired, she could not have been more wrong. When the contamination was made public weeks later in mid-September and the stories of the sick and dying babies became known, the central government in Beijing and the national media rose up in fury. The cover-up had had gruesome consequences. By the time the problem was exposed, long after the Olympics had finished and been declared a rousing success, 290,000 babies had been diagnosed as ill. Many babies–in most cases, the only children that couples were allowed to have under the one-child policy–were left with permanent kidney damage. Six infants had died. The Sanlu scandal featured many public villains. The institutions of government, the role of regulators, the inefficacies of the legal system, lax food standards, the responsibilities of company executives under corporate law, and profiteering businessmen and women–all were put in the dock in the wake of the cover-up. Ms Tian and other executives of the company were sacked, and then formally arrested and charged soon after the scandal came to light. Scores of middlemen responsible for lacing the milk powder were detained and a number later executed. The reaction was thunderous and the anger genuine, but for anyone tracking the contours of local politics, the uproar had the same slightly unreal quality that pervades public life in China. The debate focused entirely on the front stage of political life, the government and regulatory and legal systems that the citizenry read about in the media and interact with in daily life. Few dared to pull the curtain to peer backstage, to examine how the Party’s opaque powers and skewed structures had enabled the scandal at each twist and turn of its lengthy evolution.

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Crocodile Luxk Tester From China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


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Funny Sign in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


from engrish.com

Phot

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Shrinking Brains and CCTV in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


I once heard that dogs left by themselves in the backyard will actually experience brain atrophy due to the lack of stimulation. As I sit here and watch the chinese communist TV channel, I have to wonder if the same is not true of its fans……

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The Communists Descend Upon Beijing- 1949 Photo

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRNwGOhdiu836CyFiQhx38iOg2zB_TVscwqnG_mCueZ6MfPkiqmaQ79605‑004‑DDA443D9.jpg

455 × 450 – China, history of: communist troops in Beijing, 1949

britannica.com

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China’s Water Problem

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 26, 2011


From the Chinadaily.com “YICHANG, Hubei – The water level at the Three Gorges Dam, the world’s largest water control and hydropower project, dropped to 170 meters on Tuesday, the lowest level after it reached its designed highest mark of 175 meters for the first time in October last year.”

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