Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for March 30th, 2011

Translucent China- Even Soccer Matches are Corrupt

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


Here is some news fresh off the presses from xinhuanet, another governmental mouthpiece. China has had several problems regarding match fixing in soccer, which should come to no surprise to anyone who has ever lived in China, or read about China or posesses a modicum of intelligence. What I find amusing about the quote below is that one of the refs involved in the match fixing , was supposed to be ‘the best referees in China’. The reason that I laugh at this is that Sanlu, the company responsible for the toxic milk killing half a dozen Chinese kids and poisining over 250,000 others, was also touted as a ‘symbol of Chinese production capabilities’. It was chosen as one of China’s premeir brands on a show that aired a week before the Olympic games. So when I hear that this guy was a premier Chinese ref , I have to shrug and say , yeah that figures…

xinhuanet
“BEIJING, March 30 (Xinhua) — China disclosed on Wednesday the public details of the corruption cases of three Chinese soccer referees, including Lu Jun, who has been referred to in the past as China’s best soccer referee. The three soccer referees Lu Jun, Huang Junjie and Zhou Weixin were arrested on charges of taking bribes last year.

It was learned that prior to a match between the Shanghai International and Shanghai Shenhua teams on Nov. 9, 2003, Zhang Jianqiang, a former official of the China Football Association (CFA) asked Lu Jun to call the game in Shanghai Shenhua’s favor, promising that commissions would be paid to him and other referees if Shanghai Shenhua won the game.

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China Allowing More Burdens- Changing of China’s One Child Poicy in Beijing?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


Beijing – China’s capital city will make fewer couples subject to the fines charged to those who violate China’s family planning policy by having a second child, according to the municipal commission of population and family planning.
Under the new guidelines, Beijing couples that are composed of two only children and that give birth to a second child will be charged fines only if both the mother is younger than 28 and the second child is born within four years after the first.

In the past, such couples had to pay a fifth of their annual income if they had a second child either when the mother was younger than 28 or did not wait at least four years after the birth of the first child.

Not all couples, though, will be exempted from the policy. Those in which one partner has a sibling — or both partners do — will still be discouraged from having a second child.

The change comes amid wide speculation that China is planning to relax its family planning policy. But some believe it will fail to satisfy the public’s hopes.

Mu Guangzong, a professor of population research at Peking University, said the relaxed rules in Beijing are an improvement over the previous policy, but are not enough to help right China’s population imbalances and raise fertility rates.

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Great Wall

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


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Chinese Countryside

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


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China’s Unsavory Friends

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


From The Beijing Consensus- (Stefan Halper)

MYANMAR A military junta has ruled Burma—today called Myanmar—since 1962, systematically impoverishing a country once recognized for its high literacy rate and abundant natural resources. Burma today is one of the poorest countries in Asia and one of the most strictly controlled dictatorships in the world. Its economy relies heavily on the transport and sale of contraband—particularly, illegal drugs. The political culture is among the most oppressive in the world, with sustained human rights abuses, forced labor, military rape of civilians, political imprisonment, torture, trafficking of people, and the use of child soldiers. It is a dark place, in other words. The last significant popular uprising in 1988 left thousands killed by the Burmese military, and the politician Aung San Suu Kyi—the leader of the National League for Democracy in Burma and Nobel Prize winner—has been under house arrest and threat of imprisonment since she won elections for a multiparty parliament in 1990—elections that were ignored by the junta. In June 2009, the regime sentenced her to five years in prison for breaching the terms of her house arrest in a bizarre incident in which an intruder, whom she didn’t know, was found to have spent the night in her lakeside home. The sentence conveniently removes her from the coming 2010 national elections. Burma has been a pariah state since 1988, when the United States began to impose a number of sanctions on financial assistance and military equipment. The United Nations initiated a series of missions to Rangoon in 2000 aimed at opening a dialogue with the junta and promoting a transition to better governance. Some ten trips have yet to yield progress.27 An underlying cause for the stalemate lies in Beijing. Like the leaders of Angola, Uzbekistan, Sudan, and others, the Burmese junta have little to fear from being labeled a pariah state by the West when they can get what they need in greater amounts and with less effort from China. While UN envoys were attempting, with a mixture of sanctions and promises, to exert pressure on Burmese leaders to change their behavior, Beijing became Rangoon’s best friend, providing debt relief and loans, each to the tune of $30 million; FDI in excess of $280 million per year; technical assistance in oil, gas, and mining projects; and military equipment in the form of tanks, armored personnel carriers, fighter jets, attack aircraft, coastal patrol ships, small arms, and light weapons.28

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Lady Slaving Over a Pot in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


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Chinese Shops

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


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Chinese Deli

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


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Feminism in Modern China….

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


China is striding forwards economically but leaping backwards in many aspects of life. The following from xinhuanet is an example
excerpt”
According to a recent online poll conducted by China Youth Daily, nearly 60 percent of respondents had peers who hoped to marry or rely on rich and powerful men as a way to realize personal goals. Nearly half of the respondents were born after 1980.

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China and Her Toxic Friends

Posted by w_thames_the_d on March 30, 2011


From The Beijing Consensus-(Stefan Halper)

In recent years, there’s little doubt that supplies from China have greatly exacerbated the most troublesome proliferation trends in various places. These have included ambiguous technical assistance; long-range missile technology, including skins, gyros, and warhead design; and acquiescence to “third-party” transfers, where the ultimate recipients of sanctioned technologies are in violation of “end-user” agreements to which China is a party. As a January 2009 congressional report concluded, China has been a “key supplier” to all the major “serial proliferators.” 37 In just the last ten years, the U.S. government has imposed sanctions on thirty-four Chinese companies for transfers of sensitive technology and hardware to Pakistan, Iran, North Korea, Syria, and Libya. These transfers included components for weapons of mass destruction, cruise ballistic missiles, blueprints, equipment, and chemical weapons technology. 38 (See Table 3.1 for more details.)

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