Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for April 2nd, 2011

Chinese Guy and His Shop

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


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Cool Photo in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


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Chinese Schools-My Experience of Studying in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


I have suffered through many boring, tedious and poor classes, but then I came to China. Once given the opportunity to study in the emerging powerhouse, I jumped at the chance, figuring it was a once in a lifetime opportunity. While I do not regret my choice, I am a realist. One could probably garner much much much more from reading my blog, or any of its ilk, than I received from my ‘Chinese education’.
Although my school is one of China’s premier institutions of higher education, that is not saying much. Our profs were a mixture of people who were trained by those who received their education during the cultural revolution, or were coming of age at that point in time themselves. The impact is that they are ill equipped to handle a student who challenges them as we do in the west.
The result of this is that the profs typically drone on in a monotone and appear self conscious when confronted with questions. They are not good at discussions and have poor control over the class. The best profs that I saw were good due to some internal strength or characteristics they had which allowed them a modicum of control.Also, the two who were actually real profs had studied abroad. Also, they typically do not inundate the students with reading material as is done in the west and even hide the good books. To them holding knowledge is power and they do it well.

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China and the New World Disorder

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


From The Beijing Consensus- (Stefan Halper)

Timothy Garton Ash of Oxford has invented a new name for the West—the Friends of Liberal International Order, or the FLIO—which sets it in contrast to the new forms of capitalist growth emerging in other parts. “We of the FLIO,” writes Garton Ash, “must confront the prospect of a new world disorder.” Countries such as Russia, China, Iran, and Venezuela “are not simply powers that challenge the West in various respects, they also represent alternative versions of capitalism. For more than half a millennium, modernity has come to the world from the West. But now in Beijing’s Bird’s Nest stadium and the skyscrapers of Shanghai we see a form of modernity that is both non-Western and illiberal.”53

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The China Effect on Emerging Countries and Dictators

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


The author is making the point that China is in line with dictatorial regimes who are eschewing the traditional forms of loans and wish to remain as dictatorial despots.

from The Beijing Consensus- (Stefan Halper)
This emergent society of states isn’t structured like its Western counterpart. There is no commonly accepted theory of global civic culture, no acceptance of particular moral responsibilities, and no shared obligation to act on global questions such as human rights, good governance, or climate change. It’s defined less by what it is and more by what it isn’t. There is no community as such, and certainly no common narrative on universal norms. Instead, there are loose relationships that rest only on a firm respect for two things: national sovereignty and international markets.

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China Fact- China and Muslims

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


China has over 20 million Muslims.

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China Life- Like Rats Deserting a Sinking Ship

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


I’ve lived in a few poor countries in latin America, so I’ve seen many a poor person who made it their goal to get to the land of milk and honey. But what I’ve seen in Mexico, or Brazil, or Venezuela, or Bolivia, cannot even begin to compare to the desperation of the typical Chinaman to get out of this place. If you’ve never been here, you cannot imagine.
While the typical American thinks our friends to the south are desperate to get to the states, they have not seen anything like the typical Chinaman is capable of. If you come to China, the parents often throw their kids at you in a desperate attempt to get their daughter a visa. It’s as if they have a spidey sense that this place is on the verge of collapse. If that were not proof positive, then think of all the communist party members who are sending their wife and one child disappointment overseas to ‘study’. They too can see the writing on the wall. Lastly, we have the poor suckers who invest all of their life savings and cajole their little disappointment to study overseas at some second rate school, all in the hopes he can score a job and a passport, then bring over his family.
The whole China scene is eerily reminiscent of the arms race with Russia. We drove them to the brink and then shoved. With China, it would appear that the breaking point will come with the environment. As I said, the typical chinaman is desperate to get out of her and if you would pay attention to the experts, this place is sitting atop a steaming shit load of potential disasters: deforestation, pollution, cancer villages, ground water pollution, polluted plants, animals, etc. It’s as if the Chinese don’t care about their country but just want to make enough cash and leave before it’s too late.
Remember this post. When this place falls, it will be precipitated by some problems in her environment…

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The Reality of China’s Education

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


Excerpt from here:
Students top global rankings – at a cost

School students in Shanghai have proven themselves the top of the class in science, maths and reading, but that has not stopped parents from pouring scorn and ridicule on the Chinese education system.

“What you learned in childhood has nothing to do with your work in the future,” says Gao Chunying, a primary school teacher with a 16-year-old son at high school. “Our kids can’t create, and they are turning into idiots.”

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The deficiencies of China’s education system are possibly the No. 1 gripe among the country’s middle-class parents.

That is why they are signing their children up for international schools and sending them abroad in their tens of thousands.

Employers are complaining that China’s high-scoring children do not necessarily make for well-adjusted employees.

“Proportionately, is there a lot of wasted and misdirected talent here? I’m afraid there is,” says David Kelly, who runs the China Policy consultancy and is also associate professor of politics at the University of Technology, Sydney.

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Perversion in Ancient China- Pedophilia and Incest?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 2, 2011


This post is pretty nasty. It talks about sexual mores in ancient China. It is from this site.

excerpt:
Although parents traditionally sleep with their children until they are adolescents,(131) exactly what happens in Chinese family beds has not yet been much investigated, although some observers have reported that Chinese girls, like Indian, have no trace of a hymen, supposedly because caretakers “clean the sexual organs of the little children during daily washings… so scrupulously…”(132)
Like so many early civilizations, ancient China institutionalized pederasty of boys, child concubinage, the castration of small boys so they could be used sexually as eunuchs, the marriage of young brides with a number of brothers, widespread boy and girl prostitution and the regular sexual use of child servants and slaves.(133) Under the popular ancient sim pua system of marriage, parents would adopt a girl during infancy, bring her up as a sister to their son and then force them into a marriage that must be considered as incestuous in every way except genetically. Alternatively, they could adopt a son to marry his sister.(135) Sexual use of adopted girls was said to be common.(135) Parents would send their boys to aristocratic households for sexual use – if volunteered as a eunuch, the parents would have their boys’ genitals cut off, which the parents carried with them in a jar.(136) In some areas, male marriage to boys was so popular that there are records of sacrifices to patron deities of pederasty.(137)

As was also common in other early civilizations, extreme maternal symbiosis caused the Chinese to believe that women were so powerful that they depleted men of their strength by taking their semen during intercourse. The Chinese thought women ejaculated a life force (yin) during sex, which a man could absorb and gain strength from, if he could withhold ejaculation himself. Manuals were written describing methods whereby the man could hold back his semen, terminating intercourse – called “the battle” – by inhaling the breath and sucking the saliva of the woman – who is called “the enemy.(138) During adolescence, youths were instructed to have intercourse with young girls who have “undeveloped breasts,” but to practice “moderation” by withholding their semen.'(139) Rulers had more life force because they absorbed more of it from their many wives and concubines. Whether this led them to believe that men could absorb the life force from their children through intercourse is not immediately apparent, although this might be indicated by the widespread practice of buying (under the rubric of “adoption”) children in infancy under the popular mui tsai system – children who were then used by their “adoptive” parents both as domestic slaves and as sexual objects.(140) Boys, too, were often adopted for sexual use, and had their feet bound like girls-bound feet being considered sexually arousing.(141)

continue reading here http://wdbox2003.typepad.com/yishilaoshanyang/culture/

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