Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for April 6th, 2011

Chinese Guy, Motorcycle, Street, Large Bag of Stuff- China Photo

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


This guy looks justifiably pissed off.

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Another Day, Another Discovery from the West- When Will China Give Back to Society?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


I saw the article below about caffeine and how it is affected by certain receptors… actually I have ADD so I just skimmed the article. And in reality the article is secondary to my daily rant. my real question is :
WHEN WILL THE CHINESE START DISCOVERING STUFF?
I mean honestly speaking, they have been around for thousands of years and the last time they came up with anything worth a shit, the world was wandering the plains covered with puma pelts, a few years removed from dodging predators like the pterodactyl.
Come on China, get your shit together. In all my math and science classes I’d say that the Chinese were overrepresented. but then what happens to them after college, do they all disappear? Sure you see a name like Wang and Li here and there on a team associated with some big discovery, but they are always associated With some western university or firm. So my question is- with all the supposed Chinese talent, especially in the math and sciences, then what the heck are they giving back to society?
Even if we look at more pedestrian things like the Discovery channel, China simply ‘voice overs’ what has already been done, they have little to no original content. So I go back to my rant, China, when will you start giving back to the world?
Message to China: Sure we thank you for Kung pao chicken and General Tsao’s and crabmeat rangoons are the bomb, but is that all a place with 22% of the worlds population can come up with?
And I fully realize that a Chinese university is no better or worse than a middle school here, and I know that the little debacle of the 50’s and then the 60’s oh yeah and then in ’89 there was a problem that have supposedly retarded the chinese society, but wtf they’ve been around for thousands of years before that. Sure I can see that after uncle chicom took over the country lost its collective soul, but what before that? When the world was creating things like cars, steam engines, cotton gins, airplanes, jet engines, TV, telephone, telex, faxes, the freaking Chinese were toting each other around on bamboo poles.
Sorry Mr. Chinese, but imho giving back to society is not what I mean when I see theat dingy yellow cloud of sulphur and contaminents that you send across the pacific, nor do i consider the little chips of lead you love to incorporate into childrens toys and paint, nor the sullen one-child disappointments you force into the universities of other countries to be a gift to mankind. I was thinking about something you can be proud of, some way in which you have enhanced the lives of mankind….

At the end of this rant my summary is as follows:
I just ate an apple fritter or something like that from Starbucks and it has no freaking apples, so I am disappointed. But, the Colombian coffee in the new small pouches has me amped!

excerpt from the chinadaily proving that once again China is lagging behind
“WASHINGTON – US researchers have discovered two genes in which variation affects intake of caffeine, the most widely consumed stimulant in the world, according to a report described Wednesday in the open-access journal PLoS Genetics.

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China and Altering History

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


from The Party- (Richard Mcgregor)

When around the same time the author and economics columnist for the Financial Times Martin Wolf was negotiating to have his book on globalization released in China, the changes insisted on by Citic Publishing, a major state organ, all centred on his characterization of the Soviet Union and communist dictators. Instead of the ‘communist dictatorship’ of the Soviet Union, the Chinese publisher wanted to substitute ‘Soviet leaders at the time’ the Soviet ‘communist system’ was to be replaced by ‘centrally planned economy’ and in a list of power-hungry dictators, including Hitler, Stalin, Mao and Lenin, Mao’s and Lenin’s names were to be removed.

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The Communist Party in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


From The Party- (Richard Mcgregor)
In every instance and at each step of the way, the Party’s actions were only reviewable through its own internal processes and never subject to genuine public scrutiny. Other than passing references to Ms Tian’s position as the party secretary, the Communist Party’s role was barely acknowledged at all. Such observant silences remain par for the course in twenty-first-century China. The tasks of managing cadres, business, the media and the law are all in a day’s work for the Party, whose rule over China, it insists, represents ‘the verdict of history’. The Sanlu crisis displayed the system at its secretive, cabalistic worst. When it came to the private sector in China, which has blossomed in tandem with the state in the past three decades, the Party was more than happy to take its share of the credit. The Party threw out its longstanding practice of operating backstage and made sure to advertise its presence in private companies out front, in public. Far from being in conflict, the Party wanted to ensure that the private sector and officialdom were seen to be working in harmony, for the mutual benefit of all.

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Sanlu and Toxic Milk in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


Here is a blurb about how the tainted milk crisis was handled in China. The author is talking about how the ruling communist party knew about the scandal but did not want it to take away from the Olympics so they hid the informaiton

From
The Party- (Richard Mcgregor)

‘They do not like private involvement at all.’ Li had no direct contact with the Politics and Law Committee. Such party bodies prefer to exercise their control at one remove, through government organs or state-controlled professional associations. Li said he had been told by a local journalist about the committee’s directives to rein the lawyers in. The conversation between Li and the journalist was an only-in-China moment, in many ways. The journalist was in possession of important, newsworthy information about party manipulation of the legal system. But while he could pass it on privately to Li, the party’s propaganda wing ensured he could not report it in his newspaper. Gradually, Li said, the lawyers around the country who had volunteered to take the case began dropping out. Some succumbed to threats that their licences would be removed. Most discontinued their actions once the courts throughout the country refused to take the cases.

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Most Excellent Chinese Translation….

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


Why should the Chinese hire barbarians to translate when they have such stellar help from the locals. After all, this is a ‘Make Tea Device’ isn’t it?

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Misogynistic China- Ancient Chinese Saying

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


“for a woman to starve to death is a small matter, for her to lose her chastity is a great calamity”- neo Confucian saying in the Song Dynasty

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How China Dealt With the Toxic Milk Scandal

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


From The Party- (Richard Mcgregor) This is referencing the Sanlu milk scandal and how the Chinese communist party dealt with it.

“To handle the legal fallout, another shadowy branch of the Party was brought into play alongside the propaganda department, a body known as the Central Politics and Law Committee of the Politburo. Li felt the committee’s influence as soon as he tried to mount a class action for his clients. The first call pressuring him to drop the action came from the All-China Lawyers’ Association. ‘Put your faith in the Party and the government!’ he was told. Soon after, he was called in for a meeting, for another instruction. ‘Don’t take these cases, and do not try to represent clients across provinces!’ The Justice Bureau in Beijing then got in touch. ‘If you take these kinds of cases, you must report them immediately!’ The Lawyers’ Association, the Justice Bureau and indeed any legal body, all ultimately come under the control of the Politics and Law Committee. The control is exercised, backstage, out of public view, through the party cells that all legal bodies are required to maintain. The party secretary of the Lawyers’ Association, for example, was a government official from the Justice Bureau in Beijing. The city’s Justice Bureau sat under the Justice Ministry, which in turn reported ultimately to the Politics and Law Committee. ‘It is the spider at the centre of a web,’ said Li, of the committee, ‘connecting the police, the prosecutor’s office, the courts and the judiciary.’”

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China Selling Her Land to Make Up for Budget Shortfalls

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


From The Party-new (Richard Mcgregor)

Most local governments have turned to real estate for cash, selling land at often inflated prices to make up budget shortfalls. ‘The reform of the tax system means that local governments have no other source of revenue, so they concentrate on land,’ said Yu Jianrong, an academic specializing in tracking farmers’ grievances. Yu says his surveys have found that as much as 30 per cent of the fiscal budgets of the government in Hebei are raised through the sale of land, a finite resource. Throughout China, about 60 per cent of protests are related to anger over local governments selling land.

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Chinese Electric Bike

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 6, 2011


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