Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for April 13th, 2011

Chinese Entrepreneur

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


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Freedom of Expression in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


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Chinese Scrumming Across the Street

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


Chaos reigns in Chin and instead of crossing the street, they seem to hoard across it.

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Beijing at Dusk

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


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Patient Chinese

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


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Chibese Courts

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


Randall Peerenboom

More Law less courts

In China, courts do not have the power to review abstract acts (generally applicable administrative rules). They may only review specific acts, and then only for their legality rather than for their appropriateness. Nevertheless, courts in effect carry out a type of abstract review by basing their decisions on higher level legislation while ignoring inconsistent local level legislation.
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Chinese Family Hides for 12 Years in Fear of Breaking One-Child Policy Law

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


From here

Twelve years ago, in order to give birth to their child and to avoid one-child policy, Yuan Tienming fled to a rural area with his family.

The family lived hidden in a cave and in the nearby hut, not far from Luoyang in Henan Province, to avoid fines or incarceration. Two years ago, when the youngest daughter was born, Yuan Tienming gave her to his relatives because of the deplorable living conditions. For this reason Yuan Tienming has been fined with 3500 RMB because he circumvented the law and then he was released on bail. Their home is very humble, located midway down the side of a hill in a hole dug in the rock.

henan-twelve-001

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Hair Salon or Saloon? Funny Chinese Translation

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


Beijing has about 100,000 foreigners who could tell the Chinese the difference between a salon – as in hair salon or place to cut one’s hair and saloon- as in place to get a drink. The Chinese, being tight-fisted SOB’s aren’t willing to pay these foreigners to help them translate, so you get signs like this one. The place is a hair salon, but the sign says saloon…..

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Problem With Chinese Courts

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


From Randall Peerenboom

More Law less courts
“…difficult issue faced by all systems is how deferential judges should be to administrative agencies. The ALL authorizes the court to annul or remand for reconsideration administrative decisions if the agency makes its decision without sufficient essential evidence, incorrectly applies laws or regulations, violates legal procedures, or exceeds or abuses its authority. These standards could in the hands of an aggressive judiciary be developed in a way that permits the courts in effect to review acts for their appropriateness. For instance, “exceeding authority” or “abuse of authority” have been interpreted in other countries to include principles of proper purpose, relevance, reasonableness, consistency with fundamental rights and proportionality. However, Chinese courts have not been aggressive in using these potentially broad standards to review agency acts.”

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Determined Chinese Church Vows to Go on

Posted by w_thames_the_d on April 13, 2011


From here

An unofficial Chinese church says it will continue to hold outdoor services, despite pressure from the authorities.

Police officers detained more than 100 members of Shouwang Protestant church when they tried to hold an open-air service in Beijing on Sunday.

Church leaders say the organisation is purely religious – and has nothing to do with politics or human rights.

But it appears to have been caught up in a wider crackdown on dissent in China.

This latest incident comes at a time when the Chinese authorities appear to be putting pressure on all kinds of real and potential opposition to the government.

Dozens of lawyers, activists and bloggers have been detained or faced other forms of police investigation.

‘Purely religious’

The Shouwang church, which has about 1,000 members, has faced difficulties in finding a permanent meeting place. Until last month worshippers met in a restaurant.

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