Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for May 3rd, 2011

China’s Military Increasing Her Patent Applications

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


The chinadaily reports (see below) that the vaunted red army is ramping up its patent applications and becoming more and more modern. One can only imagine the power of this marvelous red fighting force as it dons the finest in chinese tech…

luirig.altervista.org

although unconfirmed at this time, it is reported that the chinese army is attempting to patent such sinister sounding things as ‘guns’, ‘airplanes’ and a specie of flying projectile called a ‘bullet’. They have said that all of this is of course homegrown technology and made from only the best and brightest minds of China .

excerpt from the chinadaily
“BEIJING – The number of patent applications from China’s national defense sector has increased rapidly in recent years, according to a report in Tuesday’s People’s Daily newspaper.”

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Come to China, Get Your ‘Grope’ on- 1 out of 5 Female Chinese Sexually Harassed at Work

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


No wonder so many foreign firms are rusing to china and no wonder so many older chinese men love to be bosses here. From the chinadaily we see that 20% of the women here have been sexually harassed. Now of course there may be some dumbass from saskatoon who says that ‘hey Jennie May flip flop was sexually harassed so it’s no different”. And I would tell him to go and brush the tooth he has jutting from his skull and put his skills towards a more worthy feat such as practicing immolation. For in the center country, the man is king and always has been. Yes he may carry a man purse nowadays and walk arm-in-arm with his man friends, but he still rules the roost.
Let me put it to you like this. China is a patriarchichal society and always has been, couple this with non existent laws and this is what you get. And yes maybe Jack Frickmore from Racine Wisconsin may say “but hey they usa has sexual harassment too. And i would then touch him genlty on that little helmet before he jumps onto the special bus and tell him that yes he is correct, but in other countries that are civilized, they have rules and if this happens then there are consequences. But as this is the center country little to nothign will happen. Read the book China Wakes and see how Sheryl WuDunn was treated when the cadre or government officals though she was merely a chinawoman. In her own words, she was groped and had to fight the guy off till she explained she was a foreign reporter. In her words, it was a symptom of the groping and much more that she had to endure. I have friends here who have told me horror stories of their bosses..

but in fairness to china, this may be an Asian thing but as I have not lived in other places I cannot comment on that. Latin America has issues in this area as well.

chinadaily:
“SHANGHAI / BEIJING – One in five female respondents have experienced sexual harassment at work, according to a recent survey.The poll found 20 percent of the 1,837 participants from 10 enterprises in Guangdong, Jiangsu and Hebei provinces and Beijing had been sexual harassment victims”

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Osama or Obama in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


I watched some chicom news last night and as they were rejoicing in the death of osama, the announcer made the mistake of calling him “Obama” a few times. It was quite funny to hear her say that Obama had been attacked then recant and say ‘Osama’ a few times. The damn names are so similar its not hard to do.

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China Vows To Continue One Child Policy- China’s Old and Young

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


China has the one child policy but I have met many who do not understand it, even Chinese. I was doing a business class and had a chinese woman argue that the policy does not exist. It does exist, but with exceptions. For instance minorities can typically have more than one child as well as people who have no brother nor sister. In addtiion, some places allow a mulligan or second child if the first is a girl.
From here:
April 29,2011
The census, conducted last year, also shows that people over the age of 60 now account for 13.3% of China’s population, compared to 10.3% in 2000. And the reserve of future workers has dwindled: People under 14 now make up 16.6% of the population, down from 23% 10 years ago.

Yet China’s leaders vowed again this week to maintain the one-child family-planning policy. This despite the census results and a decade-long campaign by an informal advocacy group of top Chinese academics and former officials who have risked their careers to argue the policy is based on flawed science and vested bureaucratic interests. China’s policy is enforced by the National Population and Family Planning Commission, which employs a half-million full-time staffers and six million part-timers. It collects millions of dollars a year in fines from people who violate family-planning rules.

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Chinese Leaders “Credit” One Child Policy with Preventing 400 Million Births!

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


This article states that Chinese leaders claim that their one child policy has prevented 400 million births! This number is astounding. It equates to about one-half of all the people living in Europe or 1.33 the amount of people living in the USA. It actually would be equal to the amount of people in Russia, Japan, Mexico AND Belgium plus Austria….
While there is no specific mention as to how the births were ‘prevented’, one can only guess. Oh yeah, the positive thing, according to the Chinese government is that by ridding the world of all these children, the country was able to limit its carbon emissions.
Quote from here:
“Chinese leaders credit the policy with preventing 400 million births, helping to lift the country out of poverty and limit its carbon emissions.”

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Chinese Rights Lawyer Still Missing

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


BEIJING (Reuters) – One of China’s most prominent human rights lawyers, Li Fangping, remains missing three days after he called his wife to say he was being led away by state security police, apparently the latest target of a crackdown on dissent.

Li disappeared Friday, the same day that Chinese authorities released his friend and fellow rights lawyer, Teng Biao, whose secretive detention for over two months was raised in Beijing last week by Michael Posner, the United States’ top diplomat on human rights.

Li, a slightly built and gently spoken Beijing lawyer who has taken on many politically contentious cases, appears to be another target of the Chinese Communist Party’s campaign to stifle dissent, which has led to the arrest, detention or informal jailing of dozens of dissidents, human rights advocates and grassroots agitators.

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Hot Weather and Shortage of Electricity- Problematic Summer in China?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


China is growing at a stellar pace, maybe too quickly. In addition they have had problems keeping up with the electrical demand. The blurb below from the chinadaily explains that the energy defecit of China is equivalent to the installed capacity of one of their states or provinces as they call them. This is strking insofar as it shows the stress that the Chinese infrastructure has undergone as well as may signal a prlbem they need to face- angry people. When the temperature climbs, people get angry. Angry people tend to do angry things. In this climate (no pun intended) this may mean that the center country may have an interesting summer of ‘011

Chinadaily from here:
“The 30 million kW electricity shortage is equivalent to the total installed capacity of Fujian or Xiamen province,” said director of the statistics department with the CEC, Xu Jing.

Chongqing municipality, Zhenjiang province and Jiangsu province have seen electricity strains while Hubei, Hunan, Jiangxi, Henan, Shanxi and Sichuan are expected to face electricity shortages in the summer.”

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China’s Communist Party to “Restrict TV stations from Airing Nothing But Entertainment On Television”!

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 3, 2011


I will make light of this blurb but in reality the message uncle chicom is putting forth is probably very deep indeed.
The idea of the article below is that uncle chicom or the party is upset that so many Chinese are happy… I mean that the party is upset that so many people enjoy watching TV… I mean that the minions have a selection of TV channels and being relatively intelligent they eschew the typical governmental diet of televised steaming scat, for something that in their opinions has a modicum of entertainment value. As such, the chicoms are moving to authorities plan to restrict TV stations’ ability to run shows aimed at nothing but entertainment and revise the system ” , Hmm, that’s right. Taking a page from the playbook of any medevil dictator the benevolent powers that be have decided that no, Mr. Chinaman does not deserve to enjoy the shows he is watching and as as such, he does not deserve as much leeway as he is exexercisingn his daily TV viewing. In light of this fact, uncle c or the party needs to point him in the right direction, lest he stray.

Thus, uncle c, is going to instill some of that ‘Red Spirit’ -presumably, by limiting those shows which according to uncle c, have no value, or as they say that the desire of uncle c is to “call [ed] for the establishment of a system that can gauge the merits of TV programs scientifically.” Ah yes. what a great idea. Why do away with things that the people may enjoy. I for one think that its high time we bring back struggle sessions and public humiliation. The dour look of the typical Chinese on the subway is just too darned optimistic for your humble author. Thus I commend the braintrust issuing this edict. I think that the only way to have a docile populace is to show movies with guys who have things that look like a cross between a habit and a table cloth draped across their large skulls. To me this type of programming is nothing less than a national treasure. Add to these a modicum of guys and ladies in flowing robes who can defy the laws of gravity and physics and I think th ecetner country will settle gently back into the mindless opiate-induced mire that they found themselves in not two centuries ago. Bravo China, Bravo!

from the chinadaily here
“BEIJING – In an attempt at improving the offerings on television, authorities plan to restrict TV stations’ ability to run shows aimed at nothing but entertainment and revise the system used to measure the success of programs. Cai Fuchao, minister of the State Administration of Radio, Film and Television, discussed those intentions….He encouraged TV channels to not set their sights solely on attracting viewers and called for the establishment of a system that can gauge the merits of TV programs scientifically…..Industry observers said the country’s TV industry is dominated by various kinds of entertainment shows.

According to a rating report released by CSM Media Research, 10.1 people out of every 100 TV viewers in 2010 watched entertainment programs on average, up from 7.4 out of 100 in 2005….Lei Jianjun, associate professor…Tsinghua University, said TV channels rush to produce shows offering little beyond entertainment because their advertisement revenue is directly tied to the number of people who tune in. ….In addition, some local TV stations have found that popularity and large profits can result from just a few well-watched entertainment shows. A dating show called If You Are the One, for instance, prompted many people last year to switch to Jiangsu satellite TV, one of the most watched TV channels in China.

If You Are the One was popular enough last year to prompt various other TV channels to air their own dating shows in an attempt at attracting larger audiences and more advertisers….Despite their success, the matchmaking programs have become the subject of much debate in China….Some contestants were heavily criticized for what certain viewers perceived to be blatant materialism and money worship….”I change the channels all the time, since I cannot find any interesting programs on TV,” said Li Chenguang, a 23-year-old employee at China Telecom in Beijing.”

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