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An American in China

Archive for May 22nd, 2011

Chinese Family Plans Meal- China Photo

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


photo from the washingtonpost.com

( AP ) – Yao Qizhong, right, and his wife, Li Rong, prepare vegetables for dinner at home in Beijing, China.

( AP ) – Yao Qizhong, right, and his wife, Li Rong, prepare vegetables for dinner at home in Beijing, China.

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Rice to Be China’s Next Great Toxic Food?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


This is from the chinadaily and ‘chinese expert’s’ hahahahaahahha, say that certain additives are safe. We must remember that some chinese experts-hahhaahah, also said that melamine is not bad either. Anyway, these clows said that certain additives are safe. I think we will see that they are cancerous or hazardous in some way shape or form. Or why else would the government here support them.

chinadaily
In response to media reports questioning the revised National Standard for Food Additives, the Ministry of Health issued a statement on Saturday, saying two additives – sodium diacetate and chitosan – were permissible for rice, and that a thickening agent – sodium starch phosphate – can be used in some rice products, such as rice noodles.

In the statement, Wang Zhutian, deputy director of the Fortified Food Office (FFO) under the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, said sodium diacetate is a widely used preservative in grain, rice and pastry, and chitosan is a coating agent used in rice. Both can help retain freshness and prevent mildew.

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China’s Horrible Drought- More Photos

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


Both from chinadaily
Here a mausoleum has been uncovered. It lie beneath the water for hundreds of years but not now. The recent floods have unearthed it.
Drought forces ancient mausoleum above water
The arches and corridors of the royal mausoleum show up. [Photo/Yangzi Evening News]

Weekly Photos: May 16 - 22
A dead tortoise lies on the cracked riverbed of Hanjiang River in Wuhan, Central China’s Hubei province, May 19, 2011. Hanjiang, one of the Yangtze River branches, is being dried up due to a lasting drought. [Photo/Xinhua]

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Chinese Brawl over Layoffs

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


As inflation hits China and layoffs become more prevalent, China will have to decide how to deal with this issue. Common knowledge says that China needs to grow her economy at 10% per year or massiive layoffs will occur. China is fearful of having so many people unemployed and their prediction of a slipping growth rate is not good for moral nor a peaceful society. Here is a case in point…

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Reblog on Chinese Dental Visit- Warning, Happy Ending….

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


from loadingdata.nl

After sev­eral phone calls and search­ing the inter­net, we found a reli­able hos­pi­tal with a dental-emergency room, shortly after five in the morn­ing my mother-in-law picked us up, and we were on our way (with a bag full of bot­tled water from the fridge) to the Tiantan Hos­pi­tal (The largest cen­ter for clin­i­cal treat­ment, teach­ing and research in neu­rol­ogy in Asia), near the Tem­ple of Heaven.
The logo of the Beijing Stomatological HospitalArriv­ing at the hos­pi­tal close to six, we found the emer­gency room closed. Since there was already a queue wait­ing for the den­tal clinic to open (at seven) they had decided to close the emer­gency room. (It is, after all, a Chi­nese hos­pi­tal) With about fifty peo­ple in front of us, we decided to take the gam­ble and go to the Bei­jing Stom­a­to­log­i­cal Hos­pi­tal out­post near Wang­fu­jing. Luck­ily my mother-in-law could reach one of her col­leagues to secure a spot in the queue, so when we arrived there we had only a hand­ful of peo­ple in front of us.
After reg­is­ter­ing at seven, we again had to wait until eight before the doc­tors started prac­tice. (with a small hick-up, as the doc­tor we reg­is­tered for turned out to be sick) Even­tu­ally I was sec­ond in line for to see one of the top physi­cians and sat in the chair shortly after eight.

continue reading here, its a pretty good story
http://blog.loadingdata.nl/2011/05/emergencies/#more-507

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11,000 Chinese Officials Punished for Corruption in 1.5 Years! How Many Got Away?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


More than 11,000 officials have been punished for construction-related graft, dereliction of duty or copyright infringement in the past year and a half,- China’s Ministry of Supervision

My questions are
1- how many officials do they have
2- are any of them clean?

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Reality of Chinese Drivers

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


from the asiatimes

CHANGSHA, China – With the explosive growth of motor vehicle sales in recent years, traffic accidents in China have also skyrocketed. So much so that the Middle Kingdom has become a world leader in deadly traffic accidents, according to official statistics. Attracting even greater attention from the public, however, is the social injustice behind these traffic accidents.

There were some 30 million cars on the road in the country last year, less than 5% of the world’s total estimated total of more than 600 million). According to Xinhua News Agency, there were more than 320,000 traffic accidents in China in 2007, with 81,649 people killed. As such, China’s death rate due to traffic accidents is six times the world average and accounts for 20% of the world total.

While some may argue that it is inevitable that the number of traffic accidents will grow as the number of vehicles hitting the roads soars, there may be no positive connection between them. During the past two decades, the number of motor vehicles in the United States jumped by 73%, yet the number of people killed in road accidents dropped by 27.5%. In Japan, the number of cars grew threefold, yet casualties due to traffic accidents dropped 55%.

So why is China’s headed in a different? It is not due to a lack of traffic regulations, but rather because these rules are often deliberately ignored, particularly by the rich, privileged and powerful. The social injustice behind this issue has led to an increase in concern from the public.

There is a historical episode that illustrates the situation. In 1901, a provincial governor of the Qing Dynasty offered a car imported from the US to Empress Cixi as a gift for her 66th birthday. This was one of the first cars the Chinese had ever seen. So one day, a happy Cixi ordered her driver to taxi her around in the Forbidden City.

To show appreciation, she rewarded the driver with a big bowl of rice wine before the journey. Overwhelmed by the unexpected favor, the driver quickly emptied the bowl and started the car. Suddenly a small eunuch ran in front of the vehicle. The drunk driver forgot where the brake was and the car ran over the eunuch and killed him.

Needless to say, nothing happened to the driver as a eunuch’s life was worthless. Later, some ministers told Cixi that it was improper for the driver to sit side-by-side with Her Majesty. The empress then ordered the driver’s seat removed and demanded the driver operate the car while dropped down on his knees.

From this some Chinese media commentators have inferred, jokingly, that the bad habit of drunk driving may have historical roots. Still, the story serves as a apt example that – even today – any rule can be bent by the privileged and powerful.

While saying that drunk-driving is a tradition may be an insult to the Chinese, it is true that operating motor vehicles while under the influence is a problem that runs rampant in the country. According to the Ministry of Public Security, it is the top killer during traffic accidents.

Although no statistics are available to indicate who the major offenders are, the general public tends to blame the rich and the powerful for dangerous driving behavior, specifically drunk-driving.

Private cars are quite popular in major Chinese cities nowadays, and luxurious sedans are still associated with social status. For example, the BMW brand is lovingly called Bao Ma, or Precious Horse, and BMW sedans are popular among the newly rich. But in recent years, Bao Ma has almost become a synonym for “traffic accident”. For instance, if you key in the words “Bao Ma” and “traffic accident” on Chinese search engine Baidu.com, you will receive 6,670,000 entries.

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China’s Ghost Cities and Video Link

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


Bloomberg TV has a piece on what hedge fund manager Jim Chanos, who called the Enron bubble, calls “ghost cities” — enormous towns, hundreds of thousands of housing units and hardly anybody living there. “People haven’t wanted to think that he China growth miracle might not have as much to it as they thought,” Chanos tells Bloomberg.
The Bloomberg reporter passes along some of the Chinese argument — the government is building for the long term, the developer presold all the units etc etc. But nobody lives there. No matter how you spin it, those are unproductive assets representing poorly invested capital. Sooner or later that has to tell a macroeconomic tale — no matter how much the Chinese government claims the paper backing the assets is valued at par.”

see video here http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/business/hancock/blog/2011/05/chinas_ghost_cities.html

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Crazy Law in China- Ai Wei Wei

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


In China the cops can detain you for 37 days before charging you with any crime. This is what happened to Ai Wei Wei. He was held for that duration and in the interim a case was being made against him, allegedly…..

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China, Pakistan and US Top Secret Helicopter

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 22, 2011


Is it just me or does the timing seem weird about the Pakistani brass visiting China and then we hear of china supplying 50 fighter jets to the pakis, all of this just a few weeks after a top secret US helicopter was downed in the raid for Bin Laden and held by the paki government. Also, the pakis said that the Chinese wanted the tail section of the top secret plane as Chinese cannot innovate and their technology is based upon purloined parts of foreign goods. The pakis said they may give uncle chicom a ‘peek’ at the ultra high tech, and now look. A big arms deal and a meeting of their respective governments. Do not be surprised if we see an ultra high secret Chinese stealth chopper in a few years. This would be consistent with China reverse engineering and once again piggy backing off the tech of a much stronger country.

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