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An American in China

Archive for May 25th, 2011

“Buy What?”- Customer Service in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


Just went to the local pharmacy/witchdoctors and upon entering was met with a collective stare of awareness usually found in inanimate objects but usually absent in higher forms of life. As I walked to the rear I was not greeted with a hello or hi, but with a “Mai Shenme” which means “Buy What”. This from a mastif-headed woman with forearms the size of bowling pins. I’m sure in her own way she possesses a certain charm, but it was lost on me. After informing the warden I was just looking, she sneered then piled away looking like Art Shell in the 70’s. I guess China does not believe in profit sharing for if so the desire of the collective chinese conscious would have driven her to perform unnatural acts upon your humble author, all in order for him to spend a buck. I’ve heard that customer service has improved greatly over the years and I can only grimace to think of what it once was….

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Rent Seeking- Why China Cannot Innovate and Add Value

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


In essence rent seeking behavior is taking advantage of a market characteristic or anomaly to make money. It has nothing to do with innovation nor creativity, this is why people from China cannot innovate, they make money by rent seeking. An example will help to clarify. A friend of mine went with some Chinese to a poor country. The point of the tour was to show how this foundation was helping the poor, in this instance it was showing how they would bring large trucks with water to poor people so they would be able to drink and bathe. Each family would line up and draw water then leave.
Some of the Chinese thought the villagers were dumb, they said that if they were smart, they would bring a huge bucket and empty the water from the truck, then they could sell the water to the rest of the villagers. The woman said the point was to bring water to all, to ease the suffering of all. The Chinese thought this ignorant, thought there was money to be made.
This is the essence of Chinese business. They add no value but merely suck the good from other things. Another example would be all of these chinese billionaires or millionaires who have gotten rich from ‘real estate’. What this means is that they have used their power and kicked farmers or poor people from their land, at times even causing their demise, all because these affluent people have the power of the communist party. Thus instead of creating value or improving the life of the people, they destroy value, take the land make a buck then try to leave China. This was also painfully evident to the Chinese in the Wenchuan earthquake of ’08 when bottles of water were being sold for 50rmb instead of 2 or 3 or given away. The few took advantage of their brothers and sisters without. Compare this to the horrible Japan earthquake where they united, were calm and helped one another. I have never been to Japan and would not say I love nor hate them, but I think that their sense of unity is what makes them fearsome warriors and an incredible enemy. I wonder what this has to say about China and her ability to fight.
This is the plague of China today and will be its undoing.

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Hainan China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


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Dirty Communists and Toxic Food in Chjina

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


People in China will do anything to make a buck, even if it kills them.
from xinhuanet
BEIJING, May 23 (Xinhua) — Chinese prosecutors have launched investigations on 57 government staff involved in food safety cases this year, the Supreme People’s Procuratorate said on Monday.Among the suspects, 18 people allegedly took bribes in 17 cases and the other 39 people were investigated for dereliction of duty in 20 cases, said Qiu Xueqiang, deputy procurator-general of the Supreme People’s Procuratorate, at a press conference.The supreme procuratorate has focused on cracking down on food safety crimes and related crimes by government staff in recent years, Qiu said.
Procuratorates nationwide have approved the arrest of 220 people for producing and selling substandard and poisonous food between September last year and April this year, he added. They have also initiated public prosecution against 113 people in 65 cases during the period.

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Osama and China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


from wantchnatimes

A baby holds a Osama bin Laden toy in Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province. Photo: CFP US Psident Barack Obama announced to the world that the most wanted terrorist in modern history has been killed, public opinion was naturally split along the geopolitical divide with most Westerners celebrating, while many in the Middle East mourned.
In China, however, the public’s reaction, as measured by a number of unscientific online polls, was split amid concern that Bin Laden’s demise might refocus dormant tensions between the US and China.
Almost 60 percent of the 500,000 people who took an online survey conducted by Hong Kong based Phoenix television, agreed with the statement that Bin Laden’s death was a sad event because “he was an anti-US warrior.”
Barely 18 percent clicked the statement to indicate they were happy that “the head of terrorism” had been killed, while almost 10 percent of respondents selected the option that indicated they didn’t care.
Meanwhile, the Chinese government didn’t waffle in its support for the killing of Bin Laden. After his death the Chinese Foreign Ministry welcomed the news, saying his death was an “important event” and that terrorists are a public enemy that China opposes terrorism in all its forms.
Another online survey posted on the Global Times’ Chinese website asked participants whether they thought the US would get tougher on China now that Bin Laden is out of the picture. More than 75 percent of the 17,000 respondents clicked “yes.”
Other online portals carried irreverent, even virulent discussions relating to Bin Laden’s death.
A thread on mop.com, one of China’s leading online bulletin boards, suggested Bin Laden’s death should be revenged by “attacking the most vulnerable parts of the US.”
One writer suggested that Bin Laden had been a helpful foil to a number of US presidents. “Thirty years ago, he helped President Reagan take down the Soviet Union, 10 years ago, he helped President Bush begin his military campaign in the Middle East, and now his sacrifice will surely help President Obama win re-election.”
While many experts discount the veracity of online surveys to provide a true measure of public opinion, they also agree that the responses are worrisome.
“Many of the opinions expressed online are irrational and ill-informed. People need to calm down and reflect on what they are saying,” said Shen Dingli, professor of international relations from Fudan University in Shanghai.
Shen has no doubt that the world is now a better, safer place without Bin Laden. “Osama bin Laden was a terrorist, and his death will not only save many people’s lives, it will also bring comfort to the families of those who died. His death is good for humanity,” he said.
Another scholar, Xu Zidong, from Hong Kong’s Lingnan University, believes the decade-old hunt for the terrorist mastermind distracted the US from engaging China on a number of contentious issues.
“Before the 911 attack, the US saw China as its biggest threat. Relations between the two countries were very tense after George W. Bush took the office in January 2001,” Xu said.
In February that year, the US Secretary of Defense, Donald Rumsfeld, upped the pressure on China by ordering a re-evaluation of Sino-US military communications strategy. A month later, Bush ordered all departments to re-evaluate their China strategy.
Two months later a US navy aircraft collided with a Chinese military fighter jet near Hainan Island, killing the Chinese pilot Wang Wei. The US aircraft made an emergency landing on Hainan and its crew of 24 were detained until the US delivered a written account of the incident to the Chinese government.
Three weeks after the military jet incident, Bush announced a $4.5-billion weapons sale to Taiwan, the largest since the president’s father sold 150 F-16 fighter jets to the island almost decade earlier.
President Bush added fuel to the fire and caused an uproar in China when he told American reporters that the US would take all necessary means to protect Taiwan.
“The Taiwan question has always been the most contentious issue between the US and China and Bush’s remarks were intolerable. To be honest, we believed the situation was going to continue to escalate,” said Zhu Feng, professor of International Relations at Peking University.
In September of that year, New York’s World Trade Center buildings were attacked and US attention become firmly fixed on to the Middle East.
“After 911, I had a sense of relief that the pressure between China and the US would ease off, but the discontent and anger among Chinese isn’t easily forgotten,” Xu said.
Over the past decade, China and the US have cooperated on a number of fronts to combat terrorism. Two weeks after 911 officials from both countries met in Washington to develop an anti-terrorism framework.
China also agreed to provide greater political and diplomatic support to the US in the United Nations after 911, noted an essay published by the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations. The authors also suggest China played a role in improving ties between the US and Pakistan.
As well, China helped hem in Al-Qeada militants by closing its border with Afghanistan and allowed an American aircraft carrier to refuel and re-supply in Hong Kong.
In response to China’s moves, the US listed the “East Turkistan Islamic Movement” as a terrorist organization in 2002, and killed it’s founder, Hasan Mahsum, during a joint military operation with Pakistan in 2003.
Relations were strained again in 2004 after the US released members of the East Turkistan Islamic Movement who were being held as prisoners in Guantanamo Bay and refused to hand them over to China.
Many political scientists believe that China and the US have too much at stake on too many other fronts to allow their country’s hawks to force a serious deterioration of relations. The two countries’ economies are all but dependent on bilateral trade, financing and investment. The countries have also cooperated on international legal issues such money laundering, human trafficking and piracy.
“The death of Bin Laden won’t have much influence on current Sino-US relations. The war on terrorism is far from over and the US will be on high alert for a terrorist attack for the next five to 10 years,” said Sun Zhe, director of the center for Sino-US relations at Tsinghua University.
“It’s unlikely the US will continue to give China a hard time and the political situation is totally different than it was in 2001. The US seems to have realized that pressure tactics can only harm relations,” he added.
And indeed relations continue to move apace as witnessed by the Third Sino-US Strategic and Economic Dialogue, which ended in the Washington yesterday. At the meeting Vice Premier Wang Qishan perhaps offered a hopeful insight into future bilateral relations when he said “China and the US have far more shared interests than differences.”
“So the voice from the Internet is just a flash in the pan, the greater trend can’t be stopped, no one wants to see giants like China and the US in conflict,” said professor Shen.

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Mr Mao- Forbidden City Pic

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


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US to Fly Drones Near China?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


“…For its part, the U.S. is developing aircraft carrier-based drones likely to be deployed in Asia to try to counter China’s military rise.
This week’s visit was delayed due to Chinese anger over the Obama administration’s approval in January 2010 of a $6.4 billion weapons sale to Taiwan, the self-governing island that China claims as its own territory and that the U.S. is committed to arming.
Military-to-military relations were frozen after the arms sale was announced. A thaw began with Defense Secretary Robert Gates’ visit to Beijing last January, followed by a productive visit to Washington shortly afterward by President Hu Jintao.
Taiwan, however, remains a major problem. Just last week, Taiwan’s President Ma Ying-jeou called on Washington to grant Taiwan’s request to purchase U.S. F-16 fighter jets and diesel-powered submarines — arms that China insists Taiwan does not need.”
continue here http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/05/16/501364/main20063306.shtml

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Chinese Scrum to Enter a Bus

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


This is the reality of China….
from the chinadaily.com

New express buses trigger mixed reaction
Commuters jostle for position before the new express bus leaves Bailiqiao in Tongzhou on Tuesday. Bai Jikai / for China Daily

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Shanghai Has 4000 Camera Watchers- Big Brother with Chinese Characteristics

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


My only question is that if they have so many people watching the cameras, then how do so many Chinese get away with building illegal buildings, stuffing trash to be used as support beams and that type of thing…

chinadaily:
“The Shanghai-based Dongfang Daily reported Monday that the municipal police department has deployed 4,000 people as a part of a new 24-hour video surveillance team in the city’s latest effort to clampdown on crime.”

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Beijingers Gambling

Posted by w_thames_the_d on May 25, 2011


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