Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Archive for July 10th, 2011

China’s Super Beijing to Shanghai Train Ready- Ooops, Sorry for the Delay

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


China ripped off Japanese/German high speed tech- ALLEGEDLY and made some cheap Chinese version of high speed trains. Then they made a ton of tracks and decided to shoot Chinese all over the country at speeds in excess of 150 MPH, talk about frightening. But anyway, as the Chinese were touting this achievement to show the second coming of China, there were a few hiccups, ie quality issues, talks of corruption and shoddy workmanship, which in China is par for the course.
But just as of this weekend, this vaunted train line (Beijing to Shnghai) had a wee little hiccup. The train was stalled for 90 minutes due to a thunderstorm or some such nonsense. To be honest, I am scared shitless of that rail, but possessing a healthy death wish will stuff my fat American butt into its cheap seats just to see what it is about.After all, I do live here and as such, take my life into my own hands each time I cross the street.
I will say that my last trip on a Chinese high speed train was quite exciting for upon starting up the engine of the train emitted a raucous boom and huge spark from that little arm extending over it. All of the patrons were like wtf but the local ‘official’-read as ignorant China man with limited knowledge of anything but alcohol content of Mao tai and cost of purchasing some ‘ hand love’ from the nearest villager named ‘ xiao something’ said that we must get inside the train and and do not worry he had checked its quality before. I feel lucky to still be alive.

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment »

Bank of China Sued for Assisting Terrorists?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


I knew that China does not have scruples per se, when it comes to obeying international terror laws, except when it comes to XJ and Reebya K…But in the news, they have said that a judge in the Supreme court of the US is allowing a lawsuit flied by Israeli terrorist victims against the bank of China to proceed. According to the suit, the Bank of China provided wire transfer service of funds for two alleged terror groups.

Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments »

Horney in China- China’s Sex Toy Market

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


Wantchinatimes said, “Selling sex toys in China is able to bring an annual revenue of about US$15 billion, even though scholars keep warning that indulgence in these gadgets is harmful, according to a recent report by China Daily.”
Wow, the Chinese spend 15 billion on sex toys, that is like U$12 for each man woman and child, or like nearly U$20 for all adults or nearly U$38 for all of those sexually repressed men. But if we analyze this further, the news recently said that 40% of all Chinese guys over 40 cannot get wood, so we can strike them from the equation. The result is that those ladies you see wearing those ugly little socks and idiotic big round hats that flop in their faces when they ride bikes, are buying a ton of little ‘happy gadgets’. But then again the Chinese news said that according to the local women most of the guys here do a poor job of laying pipe so the little ‘pleasure pulse’ probably does a much better job anyway.
My two cents, invest in anything related to batteries in China.
images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSDqkc2uZV71Gm7iUvfO0MVj9X-6JeSy9o-FtgSVmcpFtKJzMWNtA

470 × 381 – An Ugly Lawsuit
lawsome.net

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Photo of Why China is Taking Over

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


This pic comes from this site which is hilarious!
The site is about fashion and takes a nice but stern look at fashion in China. This photo is not really representative of the site, but I love it too much to pass up. The site, however is very well structured and well written as well as witty. The author talks about Chinese fashion missteps but in a gentle way.
from here
http://chinesepeoplehavenostyle.com/

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Dumb Chinese Laws

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


Drivers of power-driven vehicles who stop at pedestrian crossings are liable to a fine of up to five yuan, or a warning.
from here http://www.dumblaws.com/laws/china

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTdri-_8PWdyrFKfQp1VNtQM9afk9u2U0HJiL6oKTH74A-kckG6
i
chinesepeoplehavenostyle.com

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

Japan Tells China, “Suck on This”- Rare Earth Metal Find

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


China has or had a ton of rare earth metals which gave them considerable leverage with countries. These metals are needed to make advanced weapons and tech. Now the Japanese may hae found so many of them that they make China and insignificant player in the market.
from here
China’s plan to use its stranglehold on rare earth metals to hold the global high-tech industry at ransom has hit a snag: Japanese geologists have discovered massive new deposits on the floor of the Pacific Ocean. If extraction proves commercially viable, this new source of the elements critical to high-tech electronics will expand the world’s proven reserves 1,000-fold
That’s still a considerable if, since the mud in question is up to six kilometers under water. China accounts for 97% of the world’s rare earths production because its deposits are readily accessible and in relatively high concentrations, plus the government has been willing to accept the environmental damage caused by mining.
The world was content to buy from China, and mines elsewhere closed. But in the last few years, Beijing began to restrict exports, and last year shipments to Japan mysteriously dried up during a dispute over islands in the East China Sea. Multinational companies got the message that they would have to transfer production and intellectual property to China in order to secure reliable supplies.
The race was on to find new sources, and the incentive of higher prices unleashed human ingenuity. Today mines and processing facilities are in development around the world. Abundant supplies of rare earths will be the predictable result, though the surprise is that it is happening so quickly.
Journalist Jasper Becker wrote in these pages last November that China has been down this road before. In past centuries, the emperors restricted the trade of silk, tea and porcelain to extract higher prices from European traders. The traders ferreted out the secrets of how to make these treasures, and the centers of production moved offshore.
Beijing’s mistrust of the market seems to be leading it into another mistake today, as state-owned companies buy up stakes in deposits of hydrocarbons around the world. These may or may not be a good investments, but it’s doubtful that they do much for China’s energy security.
In the past three decades, China has benefited tremendously from participating in global markets. Yet in some quarters in Beijing the message hasn’t sunk in. Markets provide reliable sources because the price mechanism has incredible power: The higher prices caused by restricted access to rare earths are leading to new supplies, which will in turn bring prices down again. Once again, the main loser from China’s statism is China itself.

Posted in Uncategorized | 4 Comments »

Photo of Chinese Outdoor ‘Facilities’

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


For some reason, Chinese restrooms have historically been disgusting. One can smell them from miles away and they never seem to be cleaned. Here is a shot of what they look like from the outside…

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments »

The Sins of Our Fathers- USA and China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


The gods of fate have to be chuckling. The men and women who founded the USA traded a treasure trove of land and glory for glass trinkets and empty promises. What we could not get using this, we took by force.

Now the Chinese are taking our land and money by selling us empty promises and toxic trinkets. Maybe we should have learned from the Indians.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

China and Africa

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


The Beijing Consensus-new (Stefan Halper)

The implications of China in Africa go beyond the frustration of ordinary Africans about substandard products and the competition from Chinese small businesses. Economic history tells us that societies can only develop into “modern economies” when they begin to turn raw materials into manufactured goods. This requires industry, and it is the industrial nations that in turn become rich and powerful. Chris Alden, a leading expert in China-Africa relations, explains that if African countries wish to develop their economy and raise their populations out of poverty, as China did, they must move beyond merely being resource exporters to the outside world.47 This cannot happen in many parts of Africa, however, so long as the countries remain trapped in their role as a primary source of raw materials and a market for substandard consumer goods from elsewhere. To this extent, the authorities in Beijing have struck a troubling deal with much of the continent. Beijing pours billions of dollars in gifts and low-interest loans into the coffers of corrupt African regimes. Meanwhile, these regimes provide access to resources and a dumping ground for poor-quality products that would be unacceptable in Western markets.

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

China and Christianity

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2011


Christianity arrived in China by way of Syria in the 600s. Depending on China’s relations with the outside world, Christianity over the centuries was free to grow or was forced to operate secretly

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »