Understanding China, One Blog at a Time

An American in China

Killing, Corruption and Watching People Die- Just Another Day in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on October 24, 2013


Although the Chinese claim they are a master race and cultured, proof of these claims are anything but easy to find. Take, for example, todays news. First off we see that delighting in human suffering seems to be a cornerstone of their reason to be- story 1.
The second story talks about beefing up hospital security because Chinese are ‘hunting’ doctors and slaughtering them-article 2.

The last article addresses corruption in China and claims that it is omni-present in Chinese business- article 3.

Story 1- Chinese watch as a woman strangles to death and do nothing. As a caveat, I’d like to ask wtf the lady was thinking, leaning on the rail like that- see picture.

Excerpt

When a 26-year-old woman in Beijing leaned a little too hard against a roadside barrier and got her neck stuck between two of the railings, Chinese bystanders did what they’re increasingly notorious for doing: nothing. Security camera footage showed over a dozen people gawking and taking photos of the woman, who stood helpless on the side of a busy Beijing street in broad daylight for 30 full minutes before anyone tried to help. Finally, someone called the police, who pulled her out and rushed her to the hospital, where she was pronounced brain dead on Thursday.

Pic of the woman dying as people enjoy the sight.

China was shocked into confronting its bystander problem in 2011, with the horrific story of a two-year-old girl in Foshan who was struck by a van. The impact didn’t kill her, but it did knock her down. As she lay helpless in the road, traffic cameras captured a procession of 18 people who walked or biked past her and did nothing. One man, in a scene that played out countless times in Chinese media as the country tried to understand what had happened, actually went out of his way to walk around the injured girl. Eventually, a second car hit and killed her.

“Every foreigner in China has heard the cliche about how people there are conditioned to steer clear of the complications of others’ misfortunes, and so will not stop to help someone who is hurt or troubled in a public place,” The Atlantic’s James Fallows wroteafter the 2011 Foshan incident.

China’s bystander problem is pervasive but complex enough that everyone has a theory for it. Perhaps the most popular is shao guan xian shi, an aphorism that roughly translates as “mind your own business,” which deters both interfering and helping others. Lijia Zhang explained in a much-circulated Guardian piece (hat tip again to Fallows):

Link

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/worldviews/wp/2013/10/24/chinas-bystander-problem-another-death-after-crowd-ignores-woman-in-peril/

Story 2 killing China’s doctors. Actually this may not be such a bad thing, after all, ‘suck’ pretty much
describes the medical profession here. Beijing is going to beef up security at hospitals to prevent
Attacks on doctors. The plot flaw here is that Chinese security staff lack the balls to protect
anyone.

BEIJING – China plans to beef up security in its hospitals to prevent the deaths of doctors and nurses in attacks by patients’ relatives outraged over the cost and quality of care.

Experts say that without significant health care changes to tackle the causes of conflict, the measures will not improve safety.

Attacks on medical staff, mostly by angry relatives, killed seven people and injured 28 in 2012, according to the National Health and Family Planning Commission, which issued security guidelines with the Ministry of Public Security, China’s police force.

The guidelines suggest that the number of security guards in each hospital should be at least one per 20 patient beds, or no less than 3% of medical staff. The guidelines also call for alarm buttons, security doors and scanning equipment to detect weapons, plus more camera surveillance and foot patrols.

Link

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2013/10/24/china-hospital-attacks/3178633/

Story 3 Everyone is corrupt in China, this is a ‘no shit?’ Story. As in, we all know this anyway….

Author: In China, ‘everyone is guilty of corruption’

After taking power in March, President Xi Jinping launched a high-profile anti-corruption campaign, vowing to catch both tigers and flies — big and small corrupt officials.

Much as I appreciate our president’s determination, his battle feels like an attempt to “put out a big fire
with a glass of water,” given how corruption has reached every corner of our society.
Chinese public opinion surveys identify corruption as the most hated social problem,
yet everyone is also guilty of it.

Link
http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/23/opinion/china-corrution-lijia-zhang/

5 Responses to “Killing, Corruption and Watching People Die- Just Another Day in China”

  1. isaytomato said

    *lol* well, one should not talk bad about the dead. but when it comes to china, no morale boundaries should be allowed. this chinese bitch reminds me of china. ridiculous people die a ridiculous death. just look at that chinese bitch. this is how china will die. got her neck stuck between two of the railings. LOL

    she was a chinkese “master race”, she was probably trying to pick up 1 MAO from the ground for an extra profit when she got stucked. fucking stupid greedy brain less chinese. they deserve no better.

  2. Long time in China said

    In China you bribe the commies, the non-commies, the nurses and doctors. Yu bribe to get a train ticket, a bed in a hospital and cancer treatment. You bribe to get your product on shelves and your child into grade school. In China you bribe.

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