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Archive for the ‘Cultural oddities’ Category

Cultural oddities…

Marketing Fail in China – De ‘Rong’ Company??

Posted by w_thames_the_d on November 2, 2014


Check out this picture and tell me what you think. I really don’t know where to start. Chinese ‘learn’ English for at least years but treat it like embryos and or religion, it massacres them.

What is this idiotic Chinese company trying to say and sell?

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Posted in Counterfeits and such, Cultural oddities, Let me educate you..., Photos, Product Quality, Ranting in general | Tagged: , | 1 Comment »

China Exports Fake Dental Equipment?

Posted by w_thames_the_d on October 28, 2014


When will the world figure out that china is only good at autogenocide, misery and deceit.

Check this:
The products, ranging from drills to X-rays, were counterfeit copies of major brands or sub-standard with fake documentation.

Some products appeared to have official safety CE marks, but importers said it meant “Chinese export”.

The regulator said that dentists could be prosecuted if they knowingly bought equipment that put patients at risk.

The items were discovered during an investigation by the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Agency (MHRA), which is responsible for making sure that dental equipment in the UK meets safety standards.

Among the items seized on arrival in the UK were poorly made dentist power drills and handheld X-ray machines with dangerous wiring.

‘Serious damage’
Danny Lee-Frost, from the MHRA enforcement team, said there was a real risk to patients from equipment that does not meet strict European safety standards.

He said: “We don’t need to stretch your imagination too far to think if you’ve got a high-speed drill, operating at 30,000 revs per minute in close proximity to your teeth, and the end falls off, it’s going to do some pretty serious damage inside your mouth. ”
Link http://flip.it/XxByT

Posted in China Fact, Counterfeits and such, Cultural oddities, Let me educate you..., News From China- Whats hot | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Hacking Huawei Meet Xeroxing Xiaomi, Battle of Chinese Thieves

Posted by w_thames_the_d on October 28, 2014


Move over Hacking Huawei, there is a new thief in town! Say hello to my little Xiaomi.

For those of you who live in civilized countries with real humans, you probably never heard of Xiaomi. So here is a rundown:

From this site we see that Xiaomi is an Apple clone.

The creeper in charge of Xiaomi is named Lei Jun and he is a pathological Apple fan. A few years back he said he was waiting for Jobs to die so Xiaomi could take Apple’s place.

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In any event, Xiaomi has come out of nowhere to be a major cellphone company in China. Not surpringly, such firms usually have communist party backing and of course, Xiaomi’s boss is not only a communist but a member of its legislature as well.

One does not have to tax their mind to figure who Lei Jun is backing. But if you are too dumb to figure it out then let me help you. Take a look at the Xiaomi company mascot, a communist soldier-themed rabbit.

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If you look closely at the box the commie bunny is in front of you will see that he represents a pilot from 1921, the year the communist party was founded. Lei’s Red cred could hardly be less inconspicuous.

What has governments concerned is why Xiaomi is stealing customer data and shipping it off to Beijing even as we speak. This has been going on for months now and even in light of all the bad press, Xiaomi phines are still stealing.

Excerpt here

China has a company called Xiaomi which has lit up the cell phone industry. Its business model is to sell cheap smart phones with good specs to select groups at a time. Rather than selling vis traditional means, Xiaomi only sells online. Of course they cribbed this from Dell who had some it decades before, but Xiaomi adds a twist. In order to buy a phone one has to preregister. Yeah, you heard me right, and we are not talking iphones here. This Chinese startup has people convinced that their gear is so good that people in China prepaid just to be put on a waiting list to buy one. They now use this model, called ‘Hunger Marketing’ in southeast Asia as well.

The problem is that Xiaomi has only been selling internationally for less than one year and already Singapore, Taiwan, India, Hong Kong and Vietnam are upset about Xiaomi phones and data theft. F Secure proved that the Xiaomi ‘Red’Mi1S was copying the cyber sitters in Beijing on user data, notes, photos and more. Rather than cease and desist, Xiaomi sat on their hands,

This only served to anger those countries more and now Taiwan, Vietnam and India are considering bans of one kind or the other. The article below speaks to the threat that companies such as Xiaomi pose.

Excerpt from here

Informative eight minute video here. The two speakers discuss the dangers of The Indian Airforce using Xiaomi phones. Obviously It is not in India’s best interest to have data of their airforce personnel owned by Xiaomi, a Chinese firm. This danger is compounded by the fact that China has been increasingly pugnacious with all of its neighbors, including India. Aside from this, Lei Jun, Xiaomi’s founder, sits on the communist National People’s Congress. It takes little mental math to figure out where his loyalties lay.

Posted in China, China Fact, Counterfeits and such, Cultural oddities, Let me educate you..., News From China- Whats hot, Ranting in general, Working and Living in China | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Deceit, Fraud and Theft- The China Business Guide

Posted by w_thames_the_d on October 26, 2014


Here is a funny quote from the China Daily, aka least reputable ‘news source’ on the planet. ‘”More and more companies are not necessarily worried about moving into China, but how to manage to work with the Chinese,” said Greg Marchi, chief representative of CKGSB-Americas.

“That’s the reason we named our program ‘Doing Business With A Changing China’.”

CKGSB is hosting the program jointly with Columbia Business School next month in New York.’

Ok so let me get this straight. Some US ‘experts’ aka sellouts are setting up a program to help Americans, aka suckers to do business in China, aka hell?

Wtf? Do you really need a training course for that? Save your self the tuition and listen up. In order to do business in China you must
1- leave your wife and morals home
2- have no conscience
3- bring unmarked bills to pay
The local police
Their bosses
The local communists
Their bosses
Crooked ‘inspectors’
Their bosses
And so much more
4- leave your manners and etiquette back home
5- bring lots of bags because your Chinese hosts will want to take you ‘KTV’ing’ aka whoring
6- leave your loyalty to anything of ethical value back home for if you are in China, you will not use them

The simple fact is that businesses got to China because it is so corrupt. Grease the palms of a communist and you can have his kid if you would like. I am not kidding. When I was there I had doctor’s offer me the child of migrant laborers for less than $2000.

In China everything is for sale. All that gray you see encircling China’s big cities is merely proof of how bad corruption is in China. After all, they do have anti-pollution laws, which are obviously as vigorously enforced as their anti-corruption ones are. In China the air is not the only thing that is filthy.

What all this means is that there are a lot of people who make a lot of cash teaching you how to do business in China, but trust me, what you have read here will serve you far better than anything you are paying thousands of dollars for.

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Posted in Beijing Smog, Beijing Smog- Daily pics, Big brother..., China Fact, Cultural oddities, Let me educate you..., Ranting in general | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

Espionage and China, all You Need to Know

Posted by w_thames_the_d on October 16, 2014


China is invading the USA in bot people and comlanies. While we welcome them with open arms, they see us as a means to an end. To them it is impossible that the U s coexist in any meaningful way and they would like more than to destroy us. This sounds harsh but is true.

The following are articles are about Chinese aggressive attempts at espionage. The Chinese have never liked us and never will. We are essentially at war with them.

Articles:

China’s state sponsored hacking
The FBI on Wednesday issued a private warning to industry that a group of highly skilled Chinese government hackers was in the midst of a long-running campaign to steal valuable data from U.S. companies and government agencies.

“These state-sponsored hackers are exceedingly stealthy and agile by comparison with the People’s Liberation Army Unit 61398 . . . whose activity was publicly disclosed and attributed by security researchers in February 2013,” said the FBI in its alert, which referred to a Chinese military hacker unit exposed in a widely publicized report by the security firm Mandiant.

Indeed, U.S. officials say privately, the activities of this group are just as significant — if not more so — than those of Unit 61398.
The U.S. government has publicly called on the Chinese government to halt its widespread cybertheft of corporate secrets, but Beijing has denied such activities. When the Justice Department in May announced the indictments of five PLA officials on charges of commercial cyberespionage, the government responded by pulling out of talks to resolve differences between the two nations over cyberspace issues.

The FBI’s alert, obtained by The Washington Post, coincided with the release of a preliminary report on the same hackers by a coalition of security firms, which have dubbed the group Axiom. “The Axiom threat group is a well-resourced and sophisticated cyber espionage group that has been operating unfettered for at least four years, and most likely more,” said the report, issued by Novetta Solutions, a Northern Virginia cybersecurity firm that heads the coalition.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/fbi-warns-industry-of-chinese-cyber-campaign/2014/10/15/0349a00a-54b0-11e4-ba4b-f6333e2c0453_story.html

Spy schools
BY: Bill Gertz
July 3, 2014 5:00 am

The Chinese military revealed this week that it has set up a high-level cyberspace intelligence center amid growing concerns around the world over Beijing’s aggressive cyber espionage.

Disclosure of the new military cyber spying center followed unprecedented U.S. charges in May against five Chinese military hackers who prosecutors say engaged in widespread theft of American corporate and trade secrets through cyber espionage.

The creation of the People’s Liberation Army Cyberspace Strategic Intelligence Research Center was disclosed Monday in the official military newspaper PLA Daily.

The center is part of the General Armaments Department, whose cyber spies “will provide strong support in obtaining high-quality intelligence research findings and help China gain advantage in national information security,” the PLA Daily reported.

The Armaments Department is the chief military organ of the Communist Party’s all-powerful Central Military Commission (CMC). As part of the CMC, the cyber intelligence center will wield enormous power over both personnel and budgets within the Chinese military, intelligence, and government bureaucracy.

“The center is designed to become an authoritative research resource for Internet intelligence, build a highly-efficient cyberspace dynamically-tracking research system, provide high-end services for hot and major issues, and explore approaches of intelligence analysis as well as identification and appraisal with cyberspace characteristics,” the newspaper said.

Cyber intelligence work will include academic exchanges, conferences, published reports and translation services with the goal of expanding the center’s influence in cyberspace research.

Few details were provided on the structure and function of the cyber-spying center. However, the center will rely on cyber specialists involved in both “situation awareness” and research. Situation awareness is a term used by militaries to describe intelligence-gathering on the Internet and against information systems.

Experts who will operate the center include strategic theorists, intelligence analysts, and technology specialists.

An inaugural ceremony for the center was held June 26 where cyber warfare experts presented remarks on “cyberspace strategic situation evaluation and countermeasures.”

Military cyber programs are among the most secret elements of China’s large-scale military buildup, which has focused on developing asymmetric warfare capabilities and weapons designed to be used against a militarily stronger United States. In addition to cyber warfare tools, China’s military is building anti-satellite missiles and lasers, advanced submarines, and hypersonic strike weapons.

The announcement of the new center is unusual. Chinese government spokesmen routinely deny the military conducts any cyber intelligence operations. Senior Chinese officials, in response to claims of cyber spying, have leveled counter charges against the United States based on pilfered classified documents made public through renegade National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

Confucius spies
“The Confucius Institutes do represent a threat for the Canadian government, do represent a threat to the Canadian public,” Juneau-Katsuya told the TDSB committee.

“There is publicly available information stating clearly that Western counter-intelligence agencies have identified Confucius Institutes as forms of spy agencies used by the [Chinese] government and employed by the [Chinese] government.”

Juneau-Katsuya was one of several people who asked to address the committee. The TDSB is trying to decide whether to permanently abandon its Confucius Institute partnership after an outcry from concerned parents and trustees. The committee voted on Oct. 1 to end the partnership. The entire board will vote on the issue at the end of the month.

Promoted as non-profit organizations funded by the Chinese communist regime to teach Chinese language and culture, Confucius Institutes (CI) have been cited by China’s own officials as tools to advance the regime’s soft power.

Former CSIS head Richard Fadden said during a 2010 speech while still serving with the agency that CIs are controlled by Chinese embassies and consulates and linked them with Beijing’s efforts to influence Canadian policy.

The Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) own former propaganda chief, Li Changchun, called CIs “an important part of China’s overseas propaganda set-up.”

Former CCP leader Hu Jintao also clarified that using the name of Confucius for the institutes is no indication that the regime suddenly endorses the teachings of the ancient sage, which were widely criticized and ridiculed during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution.

Rather, the famous name allows the CCP to promote the institutes since, according to Hu’s remarks published in Chinese, “through many years of effort, we have now found the way to cultivate and prepare supporters for our Party.”

“Establishing and spreading the various Chinese language institutes such as Confucius Institutes around the world is to increase our Party’s [CCP’s] influence worldwide,” Hu said.

Confucius Institutes Rejected

“Facts are…that currently the Confucius Institutes in Canada are not increasing in number, they are decreasing in number,” Juneau-Katsuya told the TDSB committee.

McMaster University and the University of Sherbrooke shut down their CIs, and in the United States, the Pennsylvania State University and the University of Chicago recently decided to end their relationship with CIs.

“They experienced the partnership with the Confucius Institute, they experienced partnership with the Chinese government, and they decided to give up the [relationship],” Juneau-Katsuya said.

“My father used to remind me very often that wise men would learn from the experience of somebody who went through something, and the fool will wait and go through the same experience instead.”

There is no shortage of evidence showing how CIs are used for spying activities, Juneau-Katsuya said.

Investigations have shown that CI employees in certain provinces have tried to get access to government accounts and secrets, he said. What’s more, Chinese intelligence agencies do not plan in terms of years, but rather generations.

“They have developed a system where they would be capable to recruit people or identify people from very, very early ages, wait for a long period of time,­­­ and eventually sort of capture the ‘spirit’ of the love that person might have for the Chinese culture,” Juneau-Katsuya said, citing this as one of the risks of the CI coming to Toronto schools.

In another example, Juneau-Katsuya said an academic gets invited to China, is given the red-carpet treatment such as expensive meals and wine, and is made to believe he or she is someone “extremely important.”

Once the person becomes indebted to the regime, the regime’s agents will use this leverage to advance their own agenda.

“The Chinese exploit that very well, and they are good at being capable to sort of barter their way and barter their relationship with people, and that has been done over and over again.”

CSIS has observed many cases of this, Juneau-Katsuya said, where elected officials and representatives of major institutions go on visits to China and once back, implement policies favourable to Beijing in their jurisdiction, whether municipal, provincial, or federal.

Then-head of CSIS Fadden said in an interview with the CBC in 2010 that some municipal politicians and provincial cabinet ministers are under the influence of foreign governments, while alluding to China as the most aggressive country in efforts to gain influence in Canada.

CIs also target people in the industry for the Chinese regime’s benefit, Juneau-Katsuya said.

“Confucius Institutes do not only teach students, … they also go to the private sector and teach to the private sector,” he said.

The unsuspecting people from the industry attend the institute and hope to learn Chinese and build friendships. However, “there is a strategy behind all of this [for CIs] to be able to eventually recruit or simply obtain information from these people.”
http://www.theepochtimes.com/n3/1018292-hosting-confucius-institute-a-bad-idea-says-intelligence-veteran/

Regular readers of the National Interest enjoy a rich flow of essays debating the consequences of China’s return as a great power and how U.S. policy makers should respond to the challenge China’s rise will create for U.S. interests in the Asia-Pacific region and around the world.

But elsewhere in Washington’s corridors of power and across the country, the subject of China’s rise, its implications for U.S. and regional security, and how U.S. foreign policy should adjust to this development is commonly treated like the proverbial elephant in the room, clearly present, but not clearly discussed.

U.S. policy makers and the American public must face up to the fact that China’s return as a great power is inevitably creating a contest that will likely evolve into the most consequential and taxing security challenge the United States will face in the decades ahead. It will be the most consequential because the stability and prosperity of the Asia-Pacific region is of paramount importance to America’s economy, its standard of living, its future prosperity and its own role as a global power. It will be the most taxing, because China will have at its disposal far more resources than the Soviet Union ever dreamed of having. The Cold War security competition demanded much of the United States; the China challenge will demand as least as much, if not more. The China challenge is the elephant in most rooms in Washington perhaps because the magnitude of the challenge is so unsettling to policy makers and planners.

Nevertheless, U.S. policy makers and America’s political system will inevitably have to face up to the China challenge. Indeed, there are four harsh realities with which America must soon come to terms.

First, the next American president and his or her advisers will need to face up to the fact that a policy of forbearance toward China has now been tried and has failed. Forbearance has been a bipartisan policy. In 2005, former deputy secretary of state Robert Zoellick politely asked China to be a “responsible stakeholder” in the international system, with the hope and expectation that China would see its interests best fulfilled by cooperating with the existing international system. Kurt Campbell, the assistant secretary of state for Asia during Barack Obama’s first term, argued for a policy of conciliation in order to avoid the “Thucydides Trap,” the tragic clashing of great powers that has littered so much of world history. It was defensible to have tried forbearance first. However, China’s response since 2008 to forbearance has been clear: more assertiveness, more salami-slicing and an acceleration of its military modernization. Part of the deal of trying forbearance first must include a willingness to admit when it has run its course. The next set of U.S. policy makers will have to acknowledge the end of forbearance as a useful China policy.
Link http://nationalinterest.org/feature/america-must-face-the-china-challenge-11490

Posted in Big brother..., China Fact, China What they are commenting online, Cultural oddities, Uncategorized | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Man Tries to Blow Himself Up in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on September 1, 2013


Video from Reyno, which interestingly enough means ‘King’o, in Spanish…

One less useless chinese eater we have to deal with:

a chinese lost face because he was caught disrepecting airport rules, so some innocents needed to be killed for this shame!. no, not in a chinese kindergarten this time but in the beijing airport:

being chinese he think that ALL are to blame for his little dick and therefore have to die too! just because of leaflets…sicksickcountrychimpa

btw: lots of weibo users state that the chinese prick in the wheelchair wasn’t actually paralyzed. Isn’t that so chinese?

Posted in Cultural oddities | 2 Comments »

Organ Harvester Rips Out 6 Year Old’s Eyeballs in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on August 29, 2013


sometimes you wake up in China and you are like, ‘wow, I am so happy….’ And then you hack up lung sacs, eye the abysmal gray Beijing air, resent the fact that each room has only one wall outlet and as a consequence, your extension cord redefines the phrase ‘fire hazard’, and you start to rethink your happiness.

And then you begin to wonder if the day is going to be good, after all, aside from huffing noxious toxins in the air, you cannot trust the milk, the pork, nor the water. And then with China’s newest comrade in arms, aka Xi, you can be jailed for ‘spreading rumors’ on line.

And then you are like,’ no today is not going to be a good day because I live n China’.

And then, to make matters worse, you read about some organ harvesting Chinese bitch who lured a 6 year old kid into the woods and gouged out his eyeballs. Something happened and the kid ran blind back to his village and they searched for the woman but she was gone. The villagers did find the eyeballs, which still had the corneas, which the woman sought.

And then, you shake your head in disgust and wonder why you would expect anything less from a country which considers genocide to be a national sport.

In the end, their is no tear filled happiness surrounding the little child and their torment. The kid may get back his sight, but what will his life be like..

On a positive note, the family of the woman who took out his eyes is probably buying a house in your neighborhood, or her child is sitting next to you in your university class.

Have a happy China day today.

Posted in Cultural oddities | Leave a Comment »

Suggest Constitutionalism and Get Fired in China

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 10, 2013


Some teacher in China, aka guy who gets paid to give students the test answers before the test, is going to lose his job because he suggested that China should follow their constitution. Yeah, China has a constitution which reads just like our own. The only difference, however, is that most of our leaders have read ours and have a fundamental idea of what it stands for, the Chinese have done no such thing. Thus, when a guy calls for China abiding by its constitution , the communists feel their reign of kleptocracy and terror will end and they start to jail and or disappear people.

excerpt

Professor Xia Yeliang from Peking University’s School of Economics was recently warned by his superior that he may lose his position for suggesting the Communist Party launch constitutional democracy in the nation, reports Hong Kong’s Ming Pao.

Now, apparently for criticisms on his Weibo microblog account of China’s socialist system, the Communist Party and the ‘China Dream’ expounded by President Xi Jinping, Xia was recently warned that the university will make a decision in September regarding his future.

Since no more than 700 people follow his Weibo account, Xia says he is amazed to see how scared and fragile the regime is. When it was suggested to him that he express his opinions through “normal channels” instead of the internet, Xia replied that he did not know what those channels might be. As Liu Yunshan is now even more senior than in 2009 as the first secretary of the party’s Central Secretariat, Xia believes there is a high possibility he will be dismissed.

link

http://www.wantchinatimes.com/news-subclass-cnt.aspx?id=20130710000008&cid=1101

Posted in China Fact, Cultural oddities | 1 Comment »

Wicked Japanese Camel Toe, Camel Toe in Asia

Posted by w_thames_the_d on August 18, 2012


camel toe, japanese camel toe, chinese camel toe, asian camel toe

Posted in Cultural oddities, Uncategorized | Leave a Comment »

Chinese Woman Tries to Eat a Lion

Posted by w_thames_the_d on July 22, 2012


Actually I don’t know if she’s Chinese or not, probably not. If she were chinese she would be trying to eat his ‘junk’ or some other tmc bs that is meant to cure everything but communist dementia.

Posted in Cultural oddities | Leave a Comment »